The LKMco Youth and Education Podcast https://www.lkmco.org/ Iesha Small and Dr Sam Baars of LKMco (along with their expert guests) explore developments in education and youth research and policy. There is a particular focus on how research can affect teachers, educational leaders and policy makers as well as others with a wider interest in improving outcomes for all of our young people. This is a UK based show. Wed, 12 Jun 2019 05:39:56 +0000 en-GB © 2018 LKMco The education and youth 'think and action-tank' LKMco episodic LKMco loic@lkmco.org Iesha Small and Dr Sam Baars of LKMco (along with their expert guests) explore developments in education and youth research and policy. There is a particular focus on how research can affect teachers, educational leaders and policy makers as well as others with a wider interest in improving outcomes for all of our young people. This is a UK based show. Iesha Small and Dr Sam Baars of LKMco (along with their expert guests) explore developments in education and youth research and policy. There is a particular focus on how research can affect teachers, educational leaders and policy makers as well as others with a wider interest in improving outcomes for all of our young people. This is a UK based show. LKMco loic@lkmco.org clean No https://www.lkmco.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/lkmco_pod_icon_1400.jpg The LKMco Youth and Education Podcast https://www.lkmco.org/ https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.1 98719485 #033 Amanda Spielman – Ofsted. Implementing change. (New education inspection framework) https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/033-amanda-spielman-ofsted-implementing-change-new-education-inspection-framework/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=033-amanda-spielman-ofsted-implementing-change-new-education-inspection-framework Tue, 14 May 2019 06:45:31 +0000 Gemma Stevenson https://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=4768 OFSTED

In this episode, Amanda Spielman, Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Ofsted, chats to Anna Trethewey and Iesha Small of LKMco as they quiz her on her time at Ofsted and the lessons she has learnt on her journey to become HMCI.

In this episode Amanda, Iesha and Anna discuss:

  • How to affect change on a large scale, particularly in light of the launch of the new framework
  • The importance of listening to the sector and how to identify the difference between noise versus healthy criticism
  • How she goes about planning ideas before they go public and why a good essay goes a long way
  • Why Amanda likes talking to edu bloggers and why she’s never blogged herself
  • How Amanda sees Ofsted as the flip side of the autonomy that schools in England enjoy
  • The need for both internal and external consultation pieces when implementing a change as big as the new inspection framework
  • The internal culture of Ofsted and what it’s like to take on a large organisation like Ofsted
  • The advice she would give her younger self and her journey to becoming HMCI: “If I were a man, I wouldn’t have thought twice”
  • What she does to unwind at the end of a long week

Found the show useful?

Leave a review on iTunes

 

Music credits:

‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

Want to contact us?

iesha@lkmco.org / @ieshasmall

]]>

In this episode, Amanda Spielman, Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Ofsted, chats to Anna Trethewey and Iesha Small of LKMco as they quiz her on her time at Ofsted and the lessons she has learnt on her journey to become HMCI.

In this episode Amanda, Iesha and Anna discuss:

  • How to affect change on a large scale, particularly in light of the launch of the new framework
  • The importance of listening to the sector and how to identify the difference between noise versus healthy criticism
  • How she goes about planning ideas before they go public and why a good essay goes a long way
  • Why Amanda likes talking to edu bloggers and why she’s never blogged herself
  • How Amanda sees Ofsted as the flip side of the autonomy that schools in England enjoy
  • The need for both internal and external consultation pieces when implementing a change as big as the new inspection framework
  • The internal culture of Ofsted and what it’s like to take on a large organisation like Ofsted
  • The advice she would give her younger self and her journey to becoming HMCI: “If I were a man, I wouldn’t have thought twice”
  • What she does to unwind at the end of a long week

Found the show useful?

Leave a review on iTunes

 

Music credits:

‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

Want to contact us?

iesha@lkmco.org / @ieshasmall

]]>

In this episode, Amanda Spielman, Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Ofsted, chats to Anna Trethewey and Iesha Small of LKMco as they quiz her on her time at Ofsted and the lessons she has learnt on her journey to become HMCI.

In this episode Amanda, Iesha and Anna discuss:

  • How to affect change on a large scale, particularly in light of the launch of the new framework
  • The importance of listening to the sector and how to identify the difference between noise versus healthy criticism
  • How she goes about planning ideas before they go public and why a good essay goes a long way
  • Why Amanda likes talking to edu bloggers and why she’s never blogged herself
  • How Amanda sees Ofsted as the flip side of the autonomy that schools in England enjoy
  • The need for both internal and external consultation pieces when implementing a change as big as the new inspection framework
  • The internal culture of Ofsted and what it’s like to take on a large organisation like Ofsted
  • The advice she would give her younger self and her journey to becoming HMCI: “If I were a man, I wouldn’t have thought twice”
  • What she does to unwind at the end of a long week

Found the show useful?

Leave a review on iTunes

 

Music credits:

‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

Want to contact us?

iesha@lkmco.org / @ieshasmall

]]>
clean No no no 40:16 Gemma Stevenson
#032 – Research roundup – Young people’s reading habits and BAME and LGBTQ representation in children’s literature https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/032-research-roundup-young-peoples-reading-habits-and-bame-and-lgbtq-representation-in-childrens-literature/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=032-research-roundup-young-peoples-reading-habits-and-bame-and-lgbtq-representation-in-childrens-literature Thu, 04 Apr 2019 14:30:55 +0000 Gemma Stevenson https://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=4621 OFSTED

In this episode, Alix Robertson, Junior Researcher at LKMco, shares a selection of research that she has been reading lately, with Dr Sam Baars, Director of Research. Sam and Alix look at an article from The Guardian in March, which reports on the 2018 findings of an annual survey into the reading habits of 2,000 British 0- to 17-year-olds. They also discuss ‘Reflecting Realities’, a survey of ethnic representation within UK Children’s Literature in 2017 by the Centre for Literacy in Primary Education. Finally, they explore research from Sheffield Hallam University, which looks at the collections of LGBTQ* fiction for teenagers in English public library services.

In this episode Alix and Sam discuss:

  • How many children in the UK are read to daily by an adult and the value of this experience
  • Differences between boys’ and girls’ reading habits
  • The impact of screen time
  • How reading for pleasure should fit into the school curriculum
  • The under representation of BAME characters in children’s books,
  • The potential effect of this on young people, and how the situation might be improved
  • Themes and genres of children’s books that feature BAME characters
  • The prevalence of LGBTQ* fiction for teenagers in English public library services
  • Whether these texts are available in multiple copies or accessible formats
  • The value and potential of graphic novels
  • Barriers preventing libraries from having more diverse collections
  • Librarians views on their collections of LGBTQ* fiction and plans for improvements
  • Mixed methods research

Resources/people featured or mentioned

Alison Flood, Tue 5 Mar 2019

Found the show useful?

Leave a review on iTunes

 

Music credits:

‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

Want to contact us?

iesha@lkmco.org / @ieshasmall

]]>

In this episode, Alix Robertson, Junior Researcher at LKMco, shares a selection of research that she has been reading lately, with Dr Sam Baars, Director of Research. Sam and Alix look at an article from The Guardian in March, which reports on the 2018 findings of an annual survey into the reading habits of 2,000 British 0- to 17-year-olds. They also discuss ‘Reflecting Realities’, a survey of ethnic representation within UK Children’s Literature in 2017 by the Centre for Literacy in Primary Education. Finally, they explore research from Sheffield Hallam University, which looks at the collections of LGBTQ* fiction for teenagers in English public library services.

In this episode Alix and Sam discuss:

  • How many children in the UK are read to daily by an adult and the value of this experience
  • Differences between boys’ and girls’ reading habits
  • The impact of screen time
  • How reading for pleasure should fit into the school curriculum
  • The under representation of BAME characters in children’s books,
  • The potential effect of this on young people, and how the situation might be improved
  • Themes and genres of children’s books that feature BAME characters
  • The prevalence of LGBTQ* fiction for teenagers in English public library services
  • Whether these texts are available in multiple copies or accessible formats
  • The value and potential of graphic novels
  • Barriers preventing libraries from having more diverse collections
  • Librarians views on their collections of LGBTQ* fiction and plans for improvements
  • Mixed methods research

Resources/people featured or mentioned

Alison Flood, Tue 5 Mar 2019

Found the show useful?

Leave a review on iTunes

 

Music credits:

‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

Want to contact us?

iesha@lkmco.org / @ieshasmall

]]>

In this episode, Alix Robertson, Junior Researcher at LKMco, shares a selection of research that she has been reading lately, with Dr Sam Baars, Director of Research. Sam and Alix look at an article from The Guardian in March, which reports on the 2018 findings of an annual survey into the reading habits of 2,000 British 0- to 17-year-olds. They also discuss ‘Reflecting Realities’, a survey of ethnic representation within UK Children’s Literature in 2017 by the Centre for Literacy in Primary Education. Finally, they explore research from Sheffield Hallam University, which looks at the collections of LGBTQ* fiction for teenagers in English public library services.

In this episode Alix and Sam discuss:

  • How many children in the UK are read to daily by an adult and the value of this experience
  • Differences between boys’ and girls’ reading habits
  • The impact of screen time
  • How reading for pleasure should fit into the school curriculum
  • The under representation of BAME characters in children’s books,
  • The potential effect of this on young people, and how the situation might be improved
  • Themes and genres of children’s books that feature BAME characters
  • The prevalence of LGBTQ* fiction for teenagers in English public library services
  • Whether these texts are available in multiple copies or accessible formats
  • The value and potential of graphic novels
  • Barriers preventing libraries from having more diverse collections
  • Librarians views on their collections of LGBTQ* fiction and plans for improvements
  • Mixed methods research

Resources/people featured or mentioned

Alison Flood, Tue 5 Mar 2019

Found the show useful?

Leave a review on iTunes

 

Music credits:

‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

Want to contact us?

iesha@lkmco.org / @ieshasmall

]]>
clean No no no 31:15 Gemma Stevenson
#031 Research roundup: Studying abroad, teaching maths and girls engagement with science https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/031-research-roundup-studying-abroad-teaching-maths-and-girls-engagement-with-science/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=031-research-roundup-studying-abroad-teaching-maths-and-girls-engagement-with-science Thu, 28 Feb 2019 13:21:45 +0000 Gemma Stevenson https://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=4469 #interationalstudy,#science,maths

In this episode, Ellie and Sam discuss research they’ve been reading up on lately including a piece looking at the impact of studying and working abroad during higher education and whether all groups of students have equal access to these opportunities. Then, turning from higher education to the Early Years, they explore two recent pieces of research on: different approaches for teaching children maths in the Early Years, and, how even the subtlest language cues can affect whether girls are willing to engage in science, and discuss what these findings mean for Early Years teachers.

In this episode Sam and Ellie:

  • Examine the benefits of working and studying abroad during higher education
  • Delve into data which reveals that not all young people have equal access to these opportunities
  • Ponder how aptitude may also play a role in outcomes
  • Compare the research on four different approaches to teaching Maths to young children, from free play to adult/child initiated guided play to direct instruction, to see which has the most impact on learning
  • Explain their thoughts of what a free play approach to teaching maths may look like
  • Explore research on how subtle language cues influence children’s beliefs about different groups of people such as ‘Scientists’
  • Highlight key findings from research published recently on whether describing people as ‘Scientists’ increases or decreases girls’ engagement with science activities
  • Reflect on the implications of this research for overcoming stereotypes more widely

Resources/people featured or mentioned:

If you found the show useful

Leave a review on iTunes

Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

iesha@lkmco.org

info@lkmco.org

Music credits:

‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

]]>

In this episode, Ellie and Sam discuss research they’ve been reading up on lately including a piece looking at the impact of studying and working abroad during higher education and whether all groups of students have equal access to these opportunities. Then, turning from higher education to the Early Years, they explore two recent pieces of research on: different approaches for teaching children maths in the Early Years, and, how even the subtlest language cues can affect whether girls are willing to engage in science, and discuss what these findings mean for Early Years teachers.

In this episode Sam and Ellie:

  • Examine the benefits of working and studying abroad during higher education
  • Delve into data which reveals that not all young people have equal access to these opportunities
  • Ponder how aptitude may also play a role in outcomes
  • Compare the research on four different approaches to teaching Maths to young children, from free play to adult/child initiated guided play to direct instruction, to see which has the most impact on learning
  • Explain their thoughts of what a free play approach to teaching maths may look like
  • Explore research on how subtle language cues influence children’s beliefs about different groups of people such as ‘Scientists’
  • Highlight key findings from research published recently on whether describing people as ‘Scientists’ increases or decreases girls’ engagement with science activities
  • Reflect on the implications of this research for overcoming stereotypes more widely

Resources/people featured or mentioned:

If you found the show useful

Leave a review on iTunes

Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

iesha@lkmco.org

info@lkmco.org

Music credits:

‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

]]>

In this episode, Ellie and Sam discuss research they’ve been reading up on lately including a piece looking at the impact of studying and working abroad during higher education and whether all groups of students have equal access to these opportunities. Then, turning from higher education to the Early Years, they explore two recent pieces of research on: different approaches for teaching children maths in the Early Years, and, how even the subtlest language cues can affect whether girls are willing to engage in science, and discuss what these findings mean for Early Years teachers.

In this episode Sam and Ellie:

  • Examine the benefits of working and studying abroad during higher education
  • Delve into data which reveals that not all young people have equal access to these opportunities
  • Ponder how aptitude may also play a role in outcomes
  • Compare the research on four different approaches to teaching Maths to young children, from free play to adult/child initiated guided play to direct instruction, to see which has the most impact on learning
  • Explain their thoughts of what a free play approach to teaching maths may look like
  • Explore research on how subtle language cues influence children’s beliefs about different groups of people such as ‘Scientists’
  • Highlight key findings from research published recently on whether describing people as ‘Scientists’ increases or decreases girls’ engagement with science activities
  • Reflect on the implications of this research for overcoming stereotypes more widely

Resources/people featured or mentioned:

If you found the show useful

Leave a review on iTunes

Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

iesha@lkmco.org

info@lkmco.org

Music credits:

‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

]]>
clean No no no 38:22 Gemma Stevenson
#030 – Research round up: child in care reviews, faith schools and hard work https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/030-research-round-up-child-in-care-reviews-faith-schools-and-hard-work/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=030-research-round-up-child-in-care-reviews-faith-schools-and-hard-work Thu, 24 Jan 2019 08:00:21 +0000 Gemma Stevenson https://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=4363 faith schools,young people in care

In this episode, Abi explores a selection of recent and not-so-recent research that we’ve been reading in the last few weeks with Dr Sam Baars, Director of Research at LKMco. Sam and Abi look at a study from last year which looks at young people in care and their experiences of care review meetings. They also discuss faith schools’ admissions processes, looking at who attends faith schools in the UK and and how this links to performance. Finally, they look at a study on young people’s perceptions of hard work and how this relates to celebrity culture.

In this episode Abi and Sam:

  • Discuss how young people are involved in meetings related to their care and support
  • Set out what care review meetings for looked after young people are
  • Reflect on how advocates can provide support in meetings for vulnerable young people
  • Explore differences between pupils attending faith schools, and those attending other state-maintained schools
  • Look at the different types of faith schools there are in England
  • Interrogate various suggested factors driving faith schools’ attainment
  • Discuss how young people perceive ‘hard work’
  • Debate how discourses around success often focus on individual or collective acheivement
  • Think about how resilience and flexibility can be included in conversations around aspirations

Resources/people featured or mentioned:

Found the show useful?

Leave a review on iTunes

Music credits:

‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

Want to contact us?

iesha@lkmco.org / @ieshasmall

]]>

In this episode, Abi explores a selection of recent and not-so-recent research that we’ve been reading in the last few weeks with Dr Sam Baars, Director of Research at LKMco. Sam and Abi look at a study from last year which looks at young people in care and their experiences of care review meetings. They also discuss faith schools’ admissions processes, looking at who attends faith schools in the UK and and how this links to performance. Finally, they look at a study on young people’s perceptions of hard work and how this relates to celebrity culture.

In this episode Abi and Sam:

  • Discuss how young people are involved in meetings related to their care and support
  • Set out what care review meetings for looked after young people are
  • Reflect on how advocates can provide support in meetings for vulnerable young people
  • Explore differences between pupils attending faith schools, and those attending other state-maintained schools
  • Look at the different types of faith schools there are in England
  • Interrogate various suggested factors driving faith schools’ attainment
  • Discuss how young people perceive ‘hard work’
  • Debate how discourses around success often focus on individual or collective acheivement
  • Think about how resilience and flexibility can be included in conversations around aspirations

Resources/people featured or mentioned:

Found the show useful?

Leave a review on iTunes

Music credits:

‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

Want to contact us?

iesha@lkmco.org / @ieshasmall

]]>

In this episode, Abi explores a selection of recent and not-so-recent research that we’ve been reading in the last few weeks with Dr Sam Baars, Director of Research at LKMco. Sam and Abi look at a study from last year which looks at young people in care and their experiences of care review meetings. They also discuss faith schools’ admissions processes, looking at who attends faith schools in the UK and and how this links to performance. Finally, they look at a study on young people’s perceptions of hard work and how this relates to celebrity culture.

In this episode Abi and Sam:

  • Discuss how young people are involved in meetings related to their care and support
  • Set out what care review meetings for looked after young people are
  • Reflect on how advocates can provide support in meetings for vulnerable young people
  • Explore differences between pupils attending faith schools, and those attending other state-maintained schools
  • Look at the different types of faith schools there are in England
  • Interrogate various suggested factors driving faith schools’ attainment
  • Discuss how young people perceive ‘hard work’
  • Debate how discourses around success often focus on individual or collective acheivement
  • Think about how resilience and flexibility can be included in conversations around aspirations

Resources/people featured or mentioned:

Found the show useful?

Leave a review on iTunes

Music credits:

‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

Want to contact us?

iesha@lkmco.org / @ieshasmall

]]>
clean No no no 29:52 Gemma Stevenson
#029 Natalie Perera- School funding https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/029-natalie-perera-school-funding/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=029-natalie-perera-school-funding Thu, 20 Dec 2018 08:00:13 +0000 Gemma Stevenson https://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=4258 Funding

In this episode, Iesha speaks with Natalie Perera – Executive Director and Head of Research at Education Policy Institute about school funding and the implications of National Funding Formula for schools.

In this episode Natalie and Iesha:

    • Explain Natalie’s role and what drew her to it
    • Examine why education is important to Natalie
    • Talk about Natalie’s background as a civil servant and how that experience has helped in her current role
    • Discuss the school funding landscape up until 2016
    • Explain the Dedicated Schools Grant and how it locked in some previous geographical inequalities
    • Respond to thoughts on why the previous coalition government and the current government felt under pressure from local authorities to introduce changes which eventually led to the National Funding Formula
    • Look at why the growing number of academies added to the pressure to reform school funding
    • Contemplate why London has traditionally seen higher per pupil funding than other regions
    • Discuss why it has taken the government so long to implement a National Funding Formula
    • Break down the National Funding Formula and what it means for different types of schools/pupils/areas
    • Talk about problems the National Funding Formula solves, creates, exacerbates and discuss potential solutions to these issues
    • Highlights if there may be areas the National Funding Formula has not addressed
    • Consider whether the conservative manifesto pledge “no school would lose as a result of the new formula”, holds true, and why 1000 headteachers who marched on Westminster in September don’t think it does
    • Delve into the EPI report’s conclusions about the impact of the National Funding Formula on deprivation
    • Detail why Croydon and Merton are the only London boroughs to gain from the National Funding Formula changes
    • List what actionable points Natalie would like people to take away from this discussion
    • Discuss the company name change from Centre Forum to EPI and what advice Natalie would give on name changes, knowing what she knows now
    • Geek out about the recent Cosmopolitan article quoting a report from EPI- how that came about and why it is important for think tanks to be covered outside of political and mainstream news media

Resources/people featured or mentioned:

If you found the show useful

Leave a review on iTunes

Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

iesha@lkmco.org

info@lkmco.org

 

Music credits:

‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

]]>

In this episode, Iesha speaks with Natalie Perera – Executive Director and Head of Research at Education Policy Institute about school funding and the implications of National Funding Formula for schools.

In this episode Natalie and Iesha:

    • Explain Natalie’s role and what drew her to it
    • Examine why education is important to Natalie
    • Talk about Natalie’s background as a civil servant and how that experience has helped in her current role
    • Discuss the school funding landscape up until 2016
    • Explain the Dedicated Schools Grant and how it locked in some previous geographical inequalities
    • Respond to thoughts on why the previous coalition government and the current government felt under pressure from local authorities to introduce changes which eventually led to the National Funding Formula
    • Look at why the growing number of academies added to the pressure to reform school funding
    • Contemplate why London has traditionally seen higher per pupil funding than other regions
    • Discuss why it has taken the government so long to implement a National Funding Formula
    • Break down the National Funding Formula and what it means for different types of schools/pupils/areas
    • Talk about problems the National Funding Formula solves, creates, exacerbates and discuss potential solutions to these issues
    • Highlights if there may be areas the National Funding Formula has not addressed
    • Consider whether the conservative manifesto pledge “no school would lose as a result of the new formula”, holds true, and why 1000 headteachers who marched on Westminster in September don’t think it does
    • Delve into the EPI report’s conclusions about the impact of the National Funding Formula on deprivation
    • Detail why Croydon and Merton are the only London boroughs to gain from the National Funding Formula changes
    • List what actionable points Natalie would like people to take away from this discussion
    • Discuss the company name change from Centre Forum to EPI and what advice Natalie would give on name changes, knowing what she knows now
    • Geek out about the recent Cosmopolitan article quoting a report from EPI- how that came about and why it is important for think tanks to be covered outside of political and mainstream news media

Resources/people featured or mentioned:

  • EPI report – Implications of National Funding Formula for Schools
  • Cosmopolitan article on Black Mirror
  • Companies House Sensitive Words and Expressions
  • In this episode, Iesha speaks with Natalie Perera – Executive Director and Head of Research at Education Policy Institute about school funding and the implications of National Funding Formula for schools.

    In this episode Natalie and Iesha:

    Resources/people featured or mentioned:

    • EPI report – Implications of National Funding Formula for Schools
    • Cosmopolitan article on Black Mirror
    • Companies House Sensitive Words and Expressions
    • clean No no no 58:25 Gemma Stevenson #028 – Dr Sam Baars and Iesha Small: Research roundup https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/028-dr-sam-baars-and-iesha-small-research-roundup/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=028-dr-sam-baars-and-iesha-small-research-roundup Thu, 06 Dec 2018 13:00:26 +0000 Gemma Stevenson https://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=4205 Funding

      In this episode, Sam and Iesha talk through three pieces of research that hold particular interest for them:

      In this episode Sam and Iesha:

      • Talk about what interested them about these particular pieces of research
      • Discuss the new SEND framework introduced in 2014
      • Look at how children’s perspectives have been included
      • Explore the variability in the ‘quality’ of the methods used to capture children’s views
      • Shared their ethical reservations around the consent sought from participants
      • Talked about mental illness and behavioural disorder rates in young people
      • Identify mental illness as being much worse amongst LGBT teenagers
      • Explain that one piece looked at pre-school children’s mental illness rates for the first time
      • Identify the strong link between poverty and poor mental health
      • Look at where the gaps are between ethnic groups and boys and girls’ mental health
      • Talk about the difficulty in comparing performance data of infant schools and primary schools because KS1 and KS2 results are systematically different
      • Look at what happened when KS1 assessment switched from externally marked tests to teacher assessment

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Clarification re the end of KS2 tests (TA assessed of not?)

      https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/743131/KS2_Provisional_publication_2018-Text.pdf

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>

      In this episode, Sam and Iesha talk through three pieces of research that hold particular interest for them:

      In this episode Sam and Iesha:

      • Talk about what interested them about these particular pieces of research
      • Discuss the new SEND framework introduced in 2014
      • Look at how children’s perspectives have been included
      • Explore the variability in the ‘quality’ of the methods used to capture children’s views
      • Shared their ethical reservations around the consent sought from participants
      • Talked about mental illness and behavioural disorder rates in young people
      • Identify mental illness as being much worse amongst LGBT teenagers
      • Explain that one piece looked at pre-school children’s mental illness rates for the first time
      • Identify the strong link between poverty and poor mental health
      • Look at where the gaps are between ethnic groups and boys and girls’ mental health
      • Talk about the difficulty in comparing performance data of infant schools and primary schools because KS1 and KS2 results are systematically different
      • Look at what happened when KS1 assessment switched from externally marked tests to teacher assessment

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Clarification re the end of KS2 tests (TA assessed of not?)

      In this episode, Sam and Iesha talk through three pieces of research that hold particular interest for them:

      In this episode Sam and Iesha:

      • Talk about what interested them about these particular pieces of research
      • Discuss the new SEND framework introduced in 2014
      • Look at how children’s perspectives have been included
      • Explore the variability in the ‘quality’ of the methods used to capture children’s views
      • Shared their ethical reservations around the consent sought from participants
      • Talked about mental illness and behavioural disorder rates in young people
      • Identify mental illness as being much worse amongst LGBT teenagers
      • Explain that one piece looked at pre-school children’s mental illness rates for the first time
      • Identify the strong link between poverty and poor mental health
      • Look at where the gaps are between ethnic groups and boys and girls’ mental health
      • Talk about the difficulty in comparing performance data of infant schools and primary schools because KS1 and KS2 results are systematically different
      • Look at what happened when KS1 assessment switched from externally marked tests to teacher assessment

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Clarification re the end of KS2 tests (TA assessed of not?)

      clean No no no 41:52 Gemma Stevenson 027 – Sam Baars & Iesha Small – school cultures and practices https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/027-sam-baars-iesha-small-school-cultures-and-practices/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=027-sam-baars-iesha-small-school-cultures-and-practices Thu, 08 Nov 2018 14:53:30 +0000 Gemma Stevenson https://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=4057 schools

      #027 – Dr Sam Baars and Iesha Small: school cultures and practices

      In this episode, Sam and Iesha talk through the findings of our recent report for the Department for Education which looked at school cultures and practices that support the attainment of disadvantaged pupils. We discuss what we mean by ‘school culture’, how we can measure it, and the elements of culture that seem to stand out in schools where disadvantaged pupils do particularly well.

      In this episode Sam and Iesha:

      • Define what we mean by ‘qualitative coding’ and how it helps you arrange and analyse 10,000 items of data
      • Lay out the 11 areas of school culture and practice that we explored through our fieldwork
      • Discuss the research tools we used to ‘get under the hood’ of the culture in 23 schools
      • Think about the role of school leadership in setting a school’s culture
      • Explore how schools often have similar cultures and practices on the surface, but exhibit variation when you examine them in detail
      • Identify consistency as a key element of an effective school culture
      • Consider how high performing primary schools use idealistic aspirations as a ‘hook’ to get young people thinking about all of the possible futures open to them
      • Discuss how schools manage the transition from primary to secondary to avoid a ‘gulf’ in school cultures
      • Ponder why researchers always insist on giving balanced answers…
      • Share thoughts on footballers who write poetry
      • Suggest ways in which schools might want to think about their cultures
      • Think about the difference between inheriting an organisational culture and being able to start from scratch

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

       

      ]]>

      #027 – Dr Sam Baars and Iesha Small: school cultures and practices

      In this episode, Sam and Iesha talk through the findings of our recent report for the Department for Education which looked at school cultures and practices that support the attainment of disadvantaged pupils. We discuss what we mean by ‘school culture’, how we can measure it, and the elements of culture that seem to stand out in schools where disadvantaged pupils do particularly well.

      In this episode Sam and Iesha:

      • Define what we mean by ‘qualitative coding’ and how it helps you arrange and analyse 10,000 items of data
      • Lay out the 11 areas of school culture and practice that we explored through our fieldwork
      • Discuss the research tools we used to ‘get under the hood’ of the culture in 23 schools
      • Think about the role of school leadership in setting a school’s culture
      • Explore how schools often have similar cultures and practices on the surface, but exhibit variation when you examine them in detail
      • Identify consistency as a key element of an effective school culture
      • Consider how high performing primary schools use idealistic aspirations as a ‘hook’ to get young people thinking about all of the possible futures open to them
      • Discuss how schools manage the transition from primary to secondary to avoid a ‘gulf’ in school cultures
      • Ponder why researchers always insist on giving balanced answers…
      • Share thoughts on footballers who write poetry
      • Suggest ways in which schools might want to think about their cultures
      • Think about the difference between inheriting an organisational culture and being able to start from scratch

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

       

      ]]>

      #027 – Dr Sam Baars and Iesha Small: school cultures and practices

      In this episode, Sam and Iesha talk through the findings of our recent report for the Department for Education which looked at school cultures and practices that support the attainment of disadvantaged pupils. We discuss what we mean by ‘school culture’, how we can measure it, and the elements of culture that seem to stand out in schools where disadvantaged pupils do particularly well.

      In this episode Sam and Iesha:

      • Define what we mean by ‘qualitative coding’ and how it helps you arrange and analyse 10,000 items of data
      • Lay out the 11 areas of school culture and practice that we explored through our fieldwork
      • Discuss the research tools we used to ‘get under the hood’ of the culture in 23 schools
      • Think about the role of school leadership in setting a school’s culture
      • Explore how schools often have similar cultures and practices on the surface, but exhibit variation when you examine them in detail
      • Identify consistency as a key element of an effective school culture
      • Consider how high performing primary schools use idealistic aspirations as a ‘hook’ to get young people thinking about all of the possible futures open to them
      • Discuss how schools manage the transition from primary to secondary to avoid a ‘gulf’ in school cultures
      • Ponder why researchers always insist on giving balanced answers…
      • Share thoughts on footballers who write poetry
      • Suggest ways in which schools might want to think about their cultures
      • Think about the difference between inheriting an organisational culture and being able to start from scratch

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

       

      ]]>
      clean No no no 35:31 Gemma Stevenson #026 – Dr Sam Baars and Iesha Small: Conducting a Research Project (part 2) https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/26-026-dr-sam-baars-and-iesha-small-conducting-a-research-project-part-2/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=26-026-dr-sam-baars-and-iesha-small-conducting-a-research-project-part-2 Thu, 16 Aug 2018 11:00:48 +0000 Gemma Stevenson http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=3742 data,ethics,gdpr,research,social research,social science

      In this episode, Sam and Iesha continue their discussion about the early phases of conducting a research project. Their discussion focuses on research design, conducting a literature review and establishing research questions. They also talk about the ‘nuts and bolts’ of a research design, including choosing quantitative or qualitative methods and evaluate the benefits of both.

       

      In this episode Sam and Iesha:

      • Reflect on whether research questions can change during a research project
      • Highlight the importance of research questions
      • Examine the relationship between a literature review and research questions
      • Explore our recent research for the Department for Education
      • Evaluate different social research methods
      • Consider why it’s important for new social research to build on existing literature
      • Chew over the standard model of physics
      • Pick apart the Department for Education’s conclusions about Good/Outstanding schools
      • Discuss the benefits of qualitative research
      • Highlight how important transparency is in qualitative research
      • Explain what quantitative research is useful for
      • Discuss how causal claims can be established through quantitative research
      • Evaluate what research shows us about grammar schools
      • Pick apart the shortcomings of quantitative studies in the education sector

       

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found .

       

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>

      In this episode, Sam and Iesha continue their discussion about the early phases of conducting a research project. Their discussion focuses on research design, conducting a literature review and establishing research questions. They also talk about the ‘nuts and bolts’ of a research design, including choosing quantitative or qualitative methods and evaluate the benefits of both.

       

      In this episode Sam and Iesha:

      • Reflect on whether research questions can change during a research project
      • Highlight the importance of research questions
      • Examine the relationship between a literature review and research questions
      • Explore our recent research for the Department for Education
      • Evaluate different social research methods
      • Consider why it’s important for new social research to build on existing literature
      • Chew over the standard model of physics
      • Pick apart the Department for Education’s conclusions about Good/Outstanding schools
      • Discuss the benefits of qualitative research
      • Highlight how important transparency is in qualitative research
      • Explain what quantitative research is useful for
      • Discuss how causal claims can be established through quantitative research
      • Evaluate what research shows us about grammar schools
      • Pick apart the shortcomings of quantitative studies in the education sector

       

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found .

       

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>

      In this episode, Sam and Iesha continue their discussion about the early phases of conducting a research project. Their discussion focuses on research design, conducting a literature review and establishing research questions. They also talk about the ‘nuts and bolts’ of a research design, including choosing quantitative or qualitative methods and evaluate the benefits of both.

       

      In this episode Sam and Iesha:

      • Reflect on whether research questions can change during a research project
      • Highlight the importance of research questions
      • Examine the relationship between a literature review and research questions
      • Explore our recent research for the Department for Education
      • Evaluate different social research methods
      • Consider why it’s important for new social research to build on existing literature
      • Chew over the standard model of physics
      • Pick apart the Department for Education’s conclusions about Good/Outstanding schools
      • Discuss the benefits of qualitative research
      • Highlight how important transparency is in qualitative research
      • Explain what quantitative research is useful for
      • Discuss how causal claims can be established through quantitative research
      • Evaluate what research shows us about grammar schools
      • Pick apart the shortcomings of quantitative studies in the education sector

       

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found .

       

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>
      clean No no no 27:00 Gemma Stevenson
      #025 – Dr Sam Baars and Iesha Small: Conducting a Research Project (part 1) https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/025-dr-sam-baars-and-iesha-small-conducting-a-research-project-part-1/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=025-dr-sam-baars-and-iesha-small-conducting-a-research-project-part-1 Fri, 03 Aug 2018 15:00:24 +0000 Sam Baars http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=3694 data,ethics,gdpr,research,social research,social science

      In this episode Iesha starts a two-part discussion with Dr Sam Baars, LKMco’s Director of Research, about the way that we conduct research at LKMco. Iesha and Sam discuss the importance of research ethics and data security as the ‘foundations’ of good research, before running through the main elements of a research project – design, conduct, analyse, report. They then discuss research design in more detail, and how decisions about research questions, research tools, ethics and resources are all interrelated.

      In this episode Iesha and Sam:

      • Go through what the Director of Research does at LKMco
      • Discuss why data protection is important, and how it shapes the way we do our research
      • Explain how we make ethical considerations of the risk and value attached to our fieldwork
      • Consider why data protection and ethics are fundamental to what research is all about
      • Spell out why informed content is important, and how the GDPR has made consent requirements stricter
      • Explore how social research is different to journalism
      • Identify the main stages that all research projects have in common
      • Define what we mean by ‘research design’
      • Compare the features of good and bad research questions
      • Think about why specific, well-framed research questions are fundamental to high quality research
      • Consider how research questions can emerge from literature reviews and theories of change
      • Discuss how research questions impact on the design of a project and the tools used
      • Illustrate how different research methods approach the idea of ‘causality’
      • Struggle to define what an ethnographer is
      • Show how ‘researchers’ come in many different guises
      • Agree that exploring one question rather than another is always an ethical decision
      • Consider the arguments for having centrally-funded research
      • Reflect on where our funding comes from and how our research responds to that

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>

      In this episode Iesha starts a two-part discussion with Dr Sam Baars, LKMco’s Director of Research, about the way that we conduct research at LKMco. Iesha and Sam discuss the importance of research ethics and data security as the ‘foundations’ of good research, before running through the main elements of a research project – design, conduct, analyse, report. They then discuss research design in more detail, and how decisions about research questions, research tools, ethics and resources are all interrelated.

      In this episode Iesha and Sam:

      • Go through what the Director of Research does at LKMco
      • Discuss why data protection is important, and how it shapes the way we do our research
      • Explain how we make ethical considerations of the risk and value attached to our fieldwork
      • Consider why data protection and ethics are fundamental to what research is all about
      • Spell out why informed content is important, and how the GDPR has made consent requirements stricter
      • Explore how social research is different to journalism
      • Identify the main stages that all research projects have in common
      • Define what we mean by ‘research design’
      • Compare the features of good and bad research questions
      • Think about why specific, well-framed research questions are fundamental to high quality research
      • Consider how research questions can emerge from literature reviews and theories of change
      • Discuss how research questions impact on the design of a project and the tools used
      • Illustrate how different research methods approach the idea of ‘causality’
      • Struggle to define what an ethnographer is
      • Show how ‘researchers’ come in many different guises
      • Agree that exploring one question rather than another is always an ethical decision
      • Consider the arguments for having centrally-funded research
      • Reflect on where our funding comes from and how our research responds to that

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

      Mus]]>

      In this episode Iesha starts a two-part discussion with Dr Sam Baars, LKMco’s Director of Research, about the way that we conduct research at LKMco. Iesha and Sam discuss the importance of research ethics and data security as the ‘foundations’ of good research, before running through the main elements of a research project – design, conduct, analyse, report. They then discuss research design in more detail, and how decisions about research questions, research tools, ethics and resources are all interrelated.

      In this episode Iesha and Sam:

      • Go through what the Director of Research does at LKMco
      • Discuss why data protection is important, and how it shapes the way we do our research
      • Explain how we make ethical considerations of the risk and value attached to our fieldwork
      • Consider why data protection and ethics are fundamental to what research is all about
      • Spell out why informed content is important, and how the GDPR has made consent requirements stricter
      • Explore how social research is different to journalism
      • Identify the main stages that all research projects have in common
      • Define what we mean by ‘research design’
      • Compare the features of good and bad research questions
      • Think about why specific, well-framed research questions are fundamental to high quality research
      • Consider how research questions can emerge from literature reviews and theories of change
      • Discuss how research questions impact on the design of a project and the tools used
      • Illustrate how different research methods approach the idea of ‘causality’
      • Struggle to define what an ethnographer is
      • Show how ‘researchers’ come in many different guises
      • Agree that exploring one question rather than another is always an ethical decision
      • Consider the arguments for having centrally-funded research
      • Reflect on where our funding comes from and how our research responds to that

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

      Mus]]> clean No no no 44:08 Sam Baars #024 Eleanor Bernardes: Networking and professional relationships https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/024-eleanor-bernardes-networking-and-professional-relationships/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=024-eleanor-bernardes-networking-and-professional-relationships Mon, 16 Jul 2018 12:16:02 +0000 Gemma Stevenson http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=3618 data,ethics,gdpr,research,social research,social science

      In this episode Iesha talks to our very own Eleanor Bernardes from LKMco. Eleanor is a Senior Associate at LKMco, who’s work draws together a broad range of expertise across education, the arts and business development. Iesha and Eleanor discuss how networking can be perceived; how Eleanor has developed a strategic approach to developing networks; the value networking has in building professional relationships and what tactics may help people build wider and more valuable networks.

       

      In this episode Iesha and Eleanor:

      • Explain how Eleanor defines networking
      • Talk about why networking is so important to the work LKMco do
      • Reveal how Eleanor’s background has led to her current success in networking
      • Examine how Eleanor approaches networking situations and opportunities in an effective way
      • Highlight the similarities between building personal and professional networks
      • Respond to thoughts on the concept of networking carrying negative connotations
      • Explore how valuable having different networks can be for support – ‘Networking for wellbeing’
      • Highlight how their personal experiences have affected their current approach to building relationships
      • Examine how we think of networking and the language we use around it
      • Consider the differences between how men and women approach networking opportunities
      • Recognise that networking can suffer in favour of other priorities and how that can impact career success
      • Contemplate how people in power can widen their networks to better include minorities or those who might not otherwise have been on their radar – breaking out of their echo chamber
      • Discuss the theory behind network sponsorship
      • Reveal tactics that can help to develop successful long-term relationships

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      eleanor@lkmco.org

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from http://freemusicarchive.org

       

      ]]>

      In this episode Iesha talks to our very own Eleanor Bernardes from LKMco. Eleanor is a Senior Associate at LKMco, who’s work draws together a broad range of expertise across education, the arts and business development. Iesha and Eleanor discuss how networking can be perceived; how Eleanor has developed a strategic approach to developing networks; the value networking has in building professional relationships and what tactics may help people build wider and more valuable networks.

       

      In this episode Iesha and Eleanor:

      • Explain how Eleanor defines networking
      • Talk about why networking is so important to the work LKMco do
      • Reveal how Eleanor’s background has led to her current success in networking
      • Examine how Eleanor approaches networking situations and opportunities in an effective way
      • Highlight the similarities between building personal and professional networks
      • Respond to thoughts on the concept of networking carrying negative connotations
      • Explore how valuable having different networks can be for support – ‘Networking for wellbeing’
      • Highlight how their personal experiences have affected their current approach to building relationships
      • Examine how we think of networking and the language we use around it
      • Consider the differences between how men and women approach networking opportunities
      • Recognise that networking can suffer in favour of other priorities and how that can impact career success
      • Contemplate how people in power can widen their networks to better include minorities or those who might not otherwise have been on their radar – breaking out of their echo chamber
      • Discuss the theory behind network sponsorship
      • Reveal tactics that can help to develop successful long-term relationships

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      eleanor@lkmco.org

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from http://freemusicarchive.org

       

      ]]>

      In this episode Iesha talks to our very own Eleanor Bernardes from LKMco. Eleanor is a Senior Associate at LKMco, who’s work draws together a broad range of expertise across education, the arts and business development. Iesha and Eleanor discuss how networking can be perceived; how Eleanor has developed a strategic approach to developing networks; the value networking has in building professional relationships and what tactics may help people build wider and more valuable networks.

       

      In this episode Iesha and Eleanor:

      • Explain how Eleanor defines networking
      • Talk about why networking is so important to the work LKMco do
      • Reveal how Eleanor’s background has led to her current success in networking
      • Examine how Eleanor approaches networking situations and opportunities in an effective way
      • Highlight the similarities between building personal and professional networks
      • Respond to thoughts on the concept of networking carrying negative connotations
      • Explore how valuable having different networks can be for support – ‘Networking for wellbeing’
      • Highlight how their personal experiences have affected their current approach to building relationships
      • Examine how we think of networking and the language we use around it
      • Consider the differences between how men and women approach networking opportunities
      • Recognise that networking can suffer in favour of other priorities and how that can impact career success
      • Contemplate how people in power can widen their networks to better include minorities or those who might not otherwise have been on their radar – breaking out of their echo chamber
      • Discuss the theory behind network sponsorship
      • Reveal tactics that can help to develop successful long-term relationships

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      eleanor@lkmco.org

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from http://freemusicarchive.org

       

      ]]>
      clean No no no 40:37 Gemma Stevenson
      #023- Bart Shaw: Mentoring https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/023-bart-shaw-mentoring/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=023-bart-shaw-mentoring Thu, 05 Jul 2018 15:50:17 +0000 Kate Bowen-Viner http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=3574 Independent Visitor,Mentoring,research

      In this episode Sam talks to LKMco’s Bart Shaw about his recent research on mentoring (Forging Futures Through Mentoring). Sam and Bart discuss the research findings; mentoring’s popularity; the positives and risks associated with mentoring and key recommendations for mentors, mentoring programmes, schools and policy-makers.

      In this episode Sam and Bart:

      • Reveal which phases of education Bart most enjoyed
      • Discuss LKMco’s report ‘Forging Futures Through Mentoring: A Risk Worth Pursuing’
      • Consider the popularity of mentoring
      • Chew over Bart’s experience as a mentor
      • Explore different forms of mentoring
      • Explain the definition of mentoring
      • Map out how the research was conducted
      • Recognise the limitations of this research
      • Highlight mentoring’s popularity in London
      • Reflect on the Independent Visitor’s Scheme
      • Discuss how mentoring is used in schools
      • Consider what makes a successful mentor
      • Highlight the importance of mentor/mentee relationships
      • Reveal the risks mentoring can present to vulnerable young people
      • Stress the importance of research for mentoring programmes
      • Summarise best practise for mentoring programmes
      • Consider why support and training for mentors is important
      • Discuss the positive impact mentoring can have
      • Reveal what Bart would change about his actions as a mentor

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>

      In this episode Sam talks to LKMco’s Bart Shaw about his recent research on mentoring (Forging Futures Through Mentoring). Sam and Bart discuss the research findings; mentoring’s popularity; the positives and risks associated with mentoring and key recommendations for mentors, mentoring programmes, schools and policy-makers.

      In this episode Sam and Bart:

      • Reveal which phases of education Bart most enjoyed
      • Discuss LKMco’s report ‘Forging Futures Through Mentoring: A Risk Worth Pursuing’
      • Consider the popularity of mentoring
      • Chew over Bart’s experience as a mentor
      • Explore different forms of mentoring
      • Explain the definition of mentoring
      • Map out how the research was conducted
      • Recognise the limitations of this research
      • Highlight mentoring’s popularity in London
      • Reflect on the Independent Visitor’s Scheme
      • Discuss how mentoring is used in schools
      • Consider what makes a successful mentor
      • Highlight the importance of mentor/mentee relationships
      • Reveal the risks mentoring can present to vulnerable young people
      • Stress the importance of research for mentoring programmes
      • Summarise best practise for mentoring programmes
      • Consider why support and training for mentors is important
      • Discuss the positive impact mentoring can have
      • Reveal what Bart would change about his actions as a mentor

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>

      In this episode Sam talks to LKMco’s Bart Shaw about his recent research on mentoring (Forging Futures Through Mentoring). Sam and Bart discuss the research findings; mentoring’s popularity; the positives and risks associated with mentoring and key recommendations for mentors, mentoring programmes, schools and policy-makers.

      In this episode Sam and Bart:

      • Reveal which phases of education Bart most enjoyed
      • Discuss LKMco’s report ‘Forging Futures Through Mentoring: A Risk Worth Pursuing’
      • Consider the popularity of mentoring
      • Chew over Bart’s experience as a mentor
      • Explore different forms of mentoring
      • Explain the definition of mentoring
      • Map out how the research was conducted
      • Recognise the limitations of this research
      • Highlight mentoring’s popularity in London
      • Reflect on the Independent Visitor’s Scheme
      • Discuss how mentoring is used in schools
      • Consider what makes a successful mentor
      • Highlight the importance of mentor/mentee relationships
      • Reveal the risks mentoring can present to vulnerable young people
      • Stress the importance of research for mentoring programmes
      • Summarise best practise for mentoring programmes
      • Consider why support and training for mentors is important
      • Discuss the positive impact mentoring can have
      • Reveal what Bart would change about his actions as a mentor

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>
      clean No no no 40:53 Kate Bowen-Viner
      #022 Emma Sheppard: MTPT Project https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/022-emma-sheppard-mtpt-project/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=022-emma-sheppard-mtpt-project Thu, 21 Jun 2018 15:30:11 +0000 Kate Bowen-Viner http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=3516 Independent Visitor,Mentoring,research

      In this episode Iesha talks to Emma Sheppard from the Maternity Teacher/Paternity Teacher Project. Iesha and Emma discuss why Emma founded the project; how Emma felt shame as a working mother; men’s choices when they become parents; the impact of government policy on parents and why Emma thinks it is important to emphasise parents’ choice in regards to their careers. Iesha and Emma are also joined by a very special guest: Emma’s daughter Lucy.

       

      In this episode Iesha and Emma:

      • Explain the need for the MTPT project
      • Reflect on how parenting has helped Emma in the classroom
      • Reveal why Emma set up the MTPT project
      • Examine the negative impact of societal expectations for mothers
      • Highlight the MTPT project’s success so far
      • Respond to criticisms of the MTPT project
      • Explore gender stereotyping
      • Highlight how fathers’ choices are disabled by government policies
      • Examine school support for people going through IVF
      • Consider how schools should support women who have had miscarriages
      • Discuss how to make Saturday conferences accessible for parents
      • Chew over how parent teachers are treated in schools
      • Consider the relationship between parenthood and teacher retention
      • Reveal Emma’s thoughts about Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique

       

       

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

       

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>

      In this episode Iesha talks to Emma Sheppard from the Maternity Teacher/Paternity Teacher Project. Iesha and Emma discuss why Emma founded the project; how Emma felt shame as a working mother; men’s choices when they become parents; the impact of government policy on parents and why Emma thinks it is important to emphasise parents’ choice in regards to their careers. Iesha and Emma are also joined by a very special guest: Emma’s daughter Lucy.

       

      In this episode Iesha and Emma:

      • Explain the need for the MTPT project
      • Reflect on how parenting has helped Emma in the classroom
      • Reveal why Emma set up the MTPT project
      • Examine the negative impact of societal expectations for mothers
      • Highlight the MTPT project’s success so far
      • Respond to criticisms of the MTPT project
      • Explore gender stereotyping
      • Highlight how fathers’ choices are disabled by government policies
      • Examine school support for people going through IVF
      • Consider how schools should support women who have had miscarriages
      • Discuss how to make Saturday conferences accessible for parents
      • Chew over how parent teachers are treated in schools
      • Consider the relationship between parenthood and teacher retention
      • Reveal Emma’s thoughts about Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique

       

       

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

       

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>

      In this episode Iesha talks to Emma Sheppard from the Maternity Teacher/Paternity Teacher Project. Iesha and Emma discuss why Emma founded the project; how Emma felt shame as a working mother; men’s choices when they become parents; the impact of government policy on parents and why Emma thinks it is important to emphasise parents’ choice in regards to their careers. Iesha and Emma are also joined by a very special guest: Emma’s daughter Lucy.

       

      In this episode Iesha and Emma:

      • Explain the need for the MTPT project
      • Reflect on how parenting has helped Emma in the classroom
      • Reveal why Emma set up the MTPT project
      • Examine the negative impact of societal expectations for mothers
      • Highlight the MTPT project’s success so far
      • Respond to criticisms of the MTPT project
      • Explore gender stereotyping
      • Highlight how fathers’ choices are disabled by government policies
      • Examine school support for people going through IVF
      • Consider how schools should support women who have had miscarriages
      • Discuss how to make Saturday conferences accessible for parents
      • Chew over how parent teachers are treated in schools
      • Consider the relationship between parenthood and teacher retention
      • Reveal Emma’s thoughts about Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique

       

       

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

       

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>
      clean No no no 24:50 Kate Bowen-Viner
      #021 Natasha Porter: Why should society care about prisoners? https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/021-natasha-porter-why-should-society-care-about-prisoners/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=021-natasha-porter-why-should-society-care-about-prisoners Thu, 07 Jun 2018 15:00:41 +0000 Kate Bowen-Viner http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=3480 business,charity,education,education policy,family,parents,prisons,teaching,young people

      #021 – Natasha Porter: Why Should Society Care About Prisoners

      In this episode Iesha and Anna talk to Natasha Porter and Sarah Pearson from Unlocked Grads about why society should care about prisoners. Iesha, Natasha, Sarah and Anna discuss the Unlocked Grads scheme which trains top graduates as Prison Officers; Natasha’s career in education; her journey to setting up a charity; the lack of political will to improve conditions for prisoners and why Natasha believes business leaders should hire former prisoners.

      In this episode Iesha, Anna, Natasha and Sarah:

      • Explain the need for the Unlocked Grads scheme
      • Explore the story behind the name ‘Unlocked Grads’
      • Reflect on Natasha’s career in teaching and education policy
      • Discuss why being a teacher is a privilege
      • Explore what Natasha disliked about working in education policy
      • Reveal why Natasha is passionate about working in prisons
      • Examine the lack of political will to improve prisons
      • Highlight the impact you can have by working for the prison service
      • Consider the links between schools and prisons
      • Reveal how prisons are helping to support families
      • Highlight that 200,000 children a year have a parent in prison
      • Discuss the power of parents reading to their children
      • Chew over Natasha’s number one policy ask in relation to prisons
      • Examine why education is the key for tackling crime

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>

      #021 – Natasha Porter: Why Should Society Care About Prisoners

      In this episode Iesha and Anna talk to Natasha Porter and Sarah Pearson from Unlocked Grads about why society should care about prisoners. Iesha, Natasha, Sarah and Anna discuss the Unlocked Grads scheme which trains top graduates as Prison Officers; Natasha’s career in education; her journey to setting up a charity; the lack of political will to improve conditions for prisoners and why Natasha believes business leaders should hire former prisoners.

      In this episode Iesha, Anna, Natasha and Sarah:

      • Explain the need for the Unlocked Grads scheme
      • Explore the story behind the name ‘Unlocked Grads’
      • Reflect on Natasha’s career in teaching and education policy
      • Discuss why being a teacher is a privilege
      • Explore what Natasha disliked about working in education policy
      • Reveal why Natasha is passionate about working in prisons
      • Examine the lack of political will to improve prisons
      • Highlight the impact you can have by working for the prison service
      • Consider the links between schools and prisons
      • Reveal how prisons are helping to support families
      • Highlight that 200,000 children a year have a parent in prison
      • Discuss the power of parents reading to their children
      • Chew over Natasha’s number one policy ask in relation to prisons
      • Examine why education is the key for tackling crime

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>

      #021 – Natasha Porter: Why Should Society Care About Prisoners

      In this episode Iesha and Anna talk to Natasha Porter and Sarah Pearson from Unlocked Grads about why society should care about prisoners. Iesha, Natasha, Sarah and Anna discuss the Unlocked Grads scheme which trains top graduates as Prison Officers; Natasha’s career in education; her journey to setting up a charity; the lack of political will to improve conditions for prisoners and why Natasha believes business leaders should hire former prisoners.

      In this episode Iesha, Anna, Natasha and Sarah:

      • Explain the need for the Unlocked Grads scheme
      • Explore the story behind the name ‘Unlocked Grads’
      • Reflect on Natasha’s career in teaching and education policy
      • Discuss why being a teacher is a privilege
      • Explore what Natasha disliked about working in education policy
      • Reveal why Natasha is passionate about working in prisons
      • Examine the lack of political will to improve prisons
      • Highlight the impact you can have by working for the prison service
      • Consider the links between schools and prisons
      • Reveal how prisons are helping to support families
      • Highlight that 200,000 children a year have a parent in prison
      • Discuss the power of parents reading to their children
      • Chew over Natasha’s number one policy ask in relation to prisons
      • Examine why education is the key for tackling crime

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>
      clean No no no 22:18 Kate Bowen-Viner
      #020 Adrian Rogers, Lorraine Hughes and Sam Simkins: System Leadership https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/020-adrian-rogers-lorraine-hughes-and-sam-simkins-system-leadership/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=020-adrian-rogers-lorraine-hughes-and-sam-simkins-system-leadership Thu, 17 May 2018 15:30:28 +0000 Kate Bowen-Viner http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=3427 CEOs,headteachers,leadership,MATs,school leadership

      In this episode Iesha talks to Adrian Rogers, Lorraine Hughes and Sam Simkins from Chiltern Learning Trust about system leadership. They discuss the differences between headteachers and CEOs, whether headship is a good preparation for being a CEO and how Multi-Academy Trusts can facilitate flexible working.

      In this episode Iesha, Adrian, Lorraine and Sam:

      • Reflect on the differences between headteachers and CEOs
      • Consider whether MAT CEOs need to be trained teachers
      • Chew over what counts as effective preparation for system leadership
      • Consider how school leadership career pathways have changed
      • Explore what Adrian has learned about teacher recruitment and retention
      • Discuss how MATs can make use of flexible working
      • Examine how advertising for new staff needs to adapt to a modern context
      • Reveal how expensive recruitment costs can be
      • Discuss the relationships central MAT teams have with individual schools
      • Highlight the need for MAT leaders to use their coaching skills
      • Explore the teacher training opportunities available in MATs
      • Discuss what schools can learn from other industries
      • Examine why school systems are so important

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

       

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

       

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

       

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>

      In this episode Iesha talks to Adrian Rogers, Lorraine Hughes and Sam Simkins from Chiltern Learning Trust about system leadership. They discuss the differences between headteachers and CEOs, whether headship is a good preparation for being a CEO and how Multi-Academy Trusts can facilitate flexible working.

      In this episode Iesha, Adrian, Lorraine and Sam:

      • Reflect on the differences between headteachers and CEOs
      • Consider whether MAT CEOs need to be trained teachers
      • Chew over what counts as effective preparation for system leadership
      • Consider how school leadership career pathways have changed
      • Explore what Adrian has learned about teacher recruitment and retention
      • Discuss how MATs can make use of flexible working
      • Examine how advertising for new staff needs to adapt to a modern context
      • Reveal how expensive recruitment costs can be
      • Discuss the relationships central MAT teams have with individual schools
      • Highlight the need for MAT leaders to use their coaching skills
      • Explore the teacher training opportunities available in MATs
      • Discuss what schools can learn from other industries
      • Examine why school systems are so important

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

       

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

       

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

       

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>

      In this episode Iesha talks to Adrian Rogers, Lorraine Hughes and Sam Simkins from Chiltern Learning Trust about system leadership. They discuss the differences between headteachers and CEOs, whether headship is a good preparation for being a CEO and how Multi-Academy Trusts can facilitate flexible working.

      In this episode Iesha, Adrian, Lorraine and Sam:

      • Reflect on the differences between headteachers and CEOs
      • Consider whether MAT CEOs need to be trained teachers
      • Chew over what counts as effective preparation for system leadership
      • Consider how school leadership career pathways have changed
      • Explore what Adrian has learned about teacher recruitment and retention
      • Discuss how MATs can make use of flexible working
      • Examine how advertising for new staff needs to adapt to a modern context
      • Reveal how expensive recruitment costs can be
      • Discuss the relationships central MAT teams have with individual schools
      • Highlight the need for MAT leaders to use their coaching skills
      • Explore the teacher training opportunities available in MATs
      • Discuss what schools can learn from other industries
      • Examine why school systems are so important

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

       

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

       

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

       

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>
      clean No no no 19:30 Kate Bowen-Viner
      #019 – Kate Bowen-Viner: Youth Homelessness and Education https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/019-kate-bowen-viner-youth-homelessness-and-education/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=019-kate-bowen-viner-youth-homelessness-and-education Thu, 26 Apr 2018 15:30:45 +0000 Kate Bowen-Viner http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=3273 Data collection,DCLG,DfE,education,PMQs,youth homelessness

      In this episode Sam talks to Kate Bowen-Viner, an Associate at LKMco, about a report she recently co-authored on young homeless people’s experiences of education. Sam and Kate discuss the extent of youth homelessness, the time Kate challenged Theresa May, the importance of the stories behind statistics and which young people are more likely to experience homelessness.

      In this episode Sam and Kate:
      • Learn a bit more about Kate, our newest LKMco team member
      • Pick apart Theresa May’s recent comments on homelessness and the definitions of homelessness
      • Consider why young people’s voices are essential in research on youth homelessness
      • Explore the stories behind statistics on youth homelessness
      • Examine the impact of homelessness on young people’s educational experiences
      • Discuss which young people are most at risk of youth homelessness
      • Consider how official data collections on youth homelessness could be improved
      • Explore education’s complex relationship with the causes of youth homelessness
      • Chew over the role schools can feasibly play in supporting young homeless people
      • Highlight the government’s role in supporting young homeless people’s education
      • Reflect on why it might be overly simplistic to say “homelessness can happen to anyone”
      • Discuss how the LKMco team used audio and photography as part of their participatory research
      • Listen to young homeless people’s interviews with one another
      • Celebrate the work of young homeless people who took part in the research

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:
      A Place to Call Home: Understanding Youth Homelessness report
      LKMco

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful, leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions
      iesha@lkmco.org
      info@lkmco.org

      Music credits:
      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>

      In this episode Sam talks to Kate Bowen-Viner, an Associate at LKMco, about a report she recently co-authored on young homeless people’s experiences of education. Sam and Kate discuss the extent of youth homelessness, the time Kate challenged Theresa May, the importance of the stories behind statistics and which young people are more likely to experience homelessness.

      In this episode Sam and Kate:
      • Learn a bit more about Kate, our newest LKMco team member
      • Pick apart Theresa May’s recent comments on homelessness and the definitions of homelessness
      • Consider why young people’s voices are essential in research on youth homelessness
      • Explore the stories behind statistics on youth homelessness
      • Examine the impact of homelessness on young people’s educational experiences
      • Discuss which young people are most at risk of youth homelessness
      • Consider how official data collections on youth homelessness could be improved
      • Explore education’s complex relationship with the causes of youth homelessness
      • Chew over the role schools can feasibly play in supporting young homeless people
      • Highlight the government’s role in supporting young homeless people’s education
      • Reflect on why it might be overly simplistic to say “homelessness can happen to anyone”
      • Discuss how the LKMco team used audio and photography as part of their participatory research
      • Listen to young homeless people’s interviews with one another
      • Celebrate the work of young homeless people who took part in the research

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:
      A Place to Call Home: Understanding Youth Homelessness report
      LKMco

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful, leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions
      iesha@lkmco.org
      info@lkmco.org

      Music credits:
      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>

      In this episode Sam talks to Kate Bowen-Viner, an Associate at LKMco, about a report she recently co-authored on young homeless people’s experiences of education. Sam and Kate discuss the extent of youth homelessness, the time Kate challenged Theresa May, the importance of the stories behind statistics and which young people are more likely to experience homelessness.

      In this episode Sam and Kate:
      • Learn a bit more about Kate, our newest LKMco team member
      • Pick apart Theresa May’s recent comments on homelessness and the definitions of homelessness
      • Consider why young people’s voices are essential in research on youth homelessness
      • Explore the stories behind statistics on youth homelessness
      • Examine the impact of homelessness on young people’s educational experiences
      • Discuss which young people are most at risk of youth homelessness
      • Consider how official data collections on youth homelessness could be improved
      • Explore education’s complex relationship with the causes of youth homelessness
      • Chew over the role schools can feasibly play in supporting young homeless people
      • Highlight the government’s role in supporting young homeless people’s education
      • Reflect on why it might be overly simplistic to say “homelessness can happen to anyone”
      • Discuss how the LKMco team used audio and photography as part of their participatory research
      • Listen to young homeless people’s interviews with one another
      • Celebrate the work of young homeless people who took part in the research

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:
      A Place to Call Home: Understanding Youth Homelessness report
      LKMco

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful, leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions
      iesha@lkmco.org
      info@lkmco.org

      Music credits:
      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>
      clean No no no 43:04 Kate Bowen-Viner
      #018 – Charlotte Malton: Young adults and money management https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/018-charlotte-malton-young-adults-and-money-management/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=018-charlotte-malton-young-adults-and-money-management Thu, 22 Mar 2018 16:00:19 +0000 Sam Baars http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=3193 curriculum,financial literacy,money,risk,skills,social mobility charlotte malton headshot

      In this episode Iesha talks to Charlotte Malton, a Senior Research Executive at BritainThinks, about a report she recently co-authored for the Money Advice Service on young adults and money management. Iesha and Charlotte discuss how young people manage their money at different stages of their lives between 16 and 25, as well as trends in their knowledge, behaviours and attitudes, and some practical tips for managing money better.

      In this episode Iesha and Charlotte:

      • Reflect on how her training as a primary teacher led Charlotte into her current role in education research
      • Chew over the difficulties of translating research into policy
      • Discuss the social pressures that young people feel around money
      • Consider the specific gaps that young people report in their knowledge about money management
      • Reflect on how (and why) we often rely on learning practical skills ‘as we go along’
      • Examine why young people avoid revealing to friends and family when they’re struggling financially
      • Try to remember the last time they visited a bank
      • Discuss the ways in which technology is changing how younger generations manage their money
      • Admit that older people often don’t follow the financial advice they give to younger people
      • Bust some myths about how young people conceptualise and value money
      • Reflect on the relationship between personal finances, risk and social mobility
      • Consider the possibilities for incorporating financial literacy into the school curriculum
      • Compare tips and tricks for how young people can manage their money better

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>
      charlotte malton headshot

      In this episode Iesha talks to Charlotte Malton, a Senior Research Executive at BritainThinks, about a report she recently co-authored for the Money Advice Service on young adults and money management. Iesha and Charlotte discuss how young people manage their money at different stages of their lives between 16 and 25, as well as trends in their knowledge, behaviours and attitudes, and some practical tips for managing money better.

      In this episode Iesha and Charlotte:

      • Reflect on how her training as a primary teacher led Charlotte into her current role in education research
      • Chew over the difficulties of translating research into policy
      • Discuss the social pressures that young people feel around money
      • Consider the specific gaps that young people report in their knowledge about money management
      • Reflect on how (and why) we often rely on learning practical skills ‘as we go along’
      • Examine why young people avoid revealing to friends and family when they’re struggling financially
      • Try to remember the last time they visited a bank
      • Discuss the ways in which technology is changing how younger generations manage their money
      • Admit that older people often don’t follow the financial advice they give to younger people
      • Bust some myths about how young people conceptualise and value money
      • Reflect on the relationship between personal finances, risk and social mobility
      • Consider the possibilities for incorporating financial literacy into the school curriculum
      • Compare tips and tricks for how young people can manage their money better

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>
      charlotte malton headshot

      In this episode Iesha talks to Charlotte Malton, a Senior Research Executive at BritainThinks, about a report she recently co-authored for the Money Advice Service on young adults and money management. Iesha and Charlotte discuss how young people manage their money at different stages of their lives between 16 and 25, as well as trends in their knowledge, behaviours and attitudes, and some practical tips for managing money better.

      In this episode Iesha and Charlotte:

      • Reflect on how her training as a primary teacher led Charlotte into her current role in education research
      • Chew over the difficulties of translating research into policy
      • Discuss the social pressures that young people feel around money
      • Consider the specific gaps that young people report in their knowledge about money management
      • Reflect on how (and why) we often rely on learning practical skills ‘as we go along’
      • Examine why young people avoid revealing to friends and family when they’re struggling financially
      • Try to remember the last time they visited a bank
      • Discuss the ways in which technology is changing how younger generations manage their money
      • Admit that older people often don’t follow the financial advice they give to younger people
      • Bust some myths about how young people conceptualise and value money
      • Reflect on the relationship between personal finances, risk and social mobility
      • Consider the possibilities for incorporating financial literacy into the school curriculum
      • Compare tips and tricks for how young people can manage their money better

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>
      clean No no no 41:40 Sam Baars
      #017 – Research round up: aspirations, policy narratives and exclusion interventions https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/017-research-roundup-aspirations-policynarratives-exclusion/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=017-research-roundup-aspirations-policynarratives-exclusion Thu, 22 Feb 2018 16:00:26 +0000 Sam Baars http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=3112 aspirations,evaluation,exclusion,gender,HE,higher education,interventions,jobs,labour market,narratives,policy photo of sam and anna

      In this episode Anna and Sam explore a selection of the research that’s been hitting our desks in recent weeks. We discuss a major study of young people’s occupational aspirations using visual methods, a discourse analysis of the ways in which policymakers talk about students in higher education, and a systematic review of the effectiveness of different types of exclusion intervention.

      In this episode Sam and Anna discuss:

      • How seeing pictures of primary school pupils’ aspirations brought back happy memories of Sam’s own fieldwork
      • How gender stereotyping about jobs is set from a young age
      • How worries about the ‘match’ between young people’s aspirations and labour market opportunities are misplaced
      • How young people’s aspirations seem more or less stable over time depending on how you research them
      • How talk of ‘skills gaps’ is unhelpful
      • How our commitment to HE as an engine for social mobility is strictly limited to UK-born students
      • How hardly anyone talks about HE students as ‘learners’
      • Why it’s important to analyse policy narratives to help us identify policymakers’ real motivations and worldviews
      • How very little education policy is ‘something new under the sun’
      • What a ‘systematic review’ is
      • The types of school-based intervention that seem to have an impact on exclusion rates
      • How the effect of these interventions seems to be short-lived
      • Why it’s important to ensure that evaluations are as independent as possible

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

       

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>
      photo of sam and anna

      In this episode Anna and Sam explore a selection of the research that’s been hitting our desks in recent weeks. We discuss a major study of young people’s occupational aspirations using visual methods, a discourse analysis of the ways in which policymakers talk about students in higher education, and a systematic review of the effectiveness of different types of exclusion intervention.

      In this episode Sam and Anna discuss:

      • How seeing pictures of primary school pupils’ aspirations brought back happy memories of Sam’s own fieldwork
      • How gender stereotyping about jobs is set from a young age
      • How worries about the ‘match’ between young people’s aspirations and labour market opportunities are misplaced
      • How young people’s aspirations seem more or less stable over time depending on how you research them
      • How talk of ‘skills gaps’ is unhelpful
      • How our commitment to HE as an engine for social mobility is strictly limited to UK-born students
      • How hardly anyone talks about HE students as ‘learners’
      • Why it’s important to analyse policy narratives to help us identify policymakers’ real motivations and worldviews
      • How very little education policy is ‘something new under the sun’
      • What a ‘systematic review’ is
      • The types of school-based intervention that seem to have an impact on exclusion rates
      • How the effect of these interventions seems to be short-lived
      • Why it’s important to ensure that evaluations are as independent as possible

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

       

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>
      photo of sam and anna

      In this episode Anna and Sam explore a selection of the research that’s been hitting our desks in recent weeks. We discuss a major study of young people’s occupational aspirations using visual methods, a discourse analysis of the ways in which policymakers talk about students in higher education, and a systematic review of the effectiveness of different types of exclusion intervention.

      In this episode Sam and Anna discuss:

      • How seeing pictures of primary school pupils’ aspirations brought back happy memories of Sam’s own fieldwork
      • How gender stereotyping about jobs is set from a young age
      • How worries about the ‘match’ between young people’s aspirations and labour market opportunities are misplaced
      • How young people’s aspirations seem more or less stable over time depending on how you research them
      • How talk of ‘skills gaps’ is unhelpful
      • How our commitment to HE as an engine for social mobility is strictly limited to UK-born students
      • How hardly anyone talks about HE students as ‘learners’
      • Why it’s important to analyse policy narratives to help us identify policymakers’ real motivations and worldviews
      • How very little education policy is ‘something new under the sun’
      • What a ‘systematic review’ is
      • The types of school-based intervention that seem to have an impact on exclusion rates
      • How the effect of these interventions seems to be short-lived
      • Why it’s important to ensure that evaluations are as independent as possible

      Resources/people featured or mentioned:

       

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>
      clean No no no 30:01 Sam Baars
      #016 – Sam Simkins: Marketing for schools https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/016-sam-simkins-marketing-schools/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=016-sam-simkins-marketing-schools Thu, 08 Feb 2018 16:00:37 +0000 Sam Baars http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=3057 marketing,MATs,Parental engagement,parents,recruitment,social media,teachers sam simkins headshot

      In this episode Iesha talks to Sam Simkins. Sam is a Business Development Intern at Chiltern Learning Trust, where he maintains the social media accounts for the schools within the Trust, helping them to engage with parents and recruit new teachers. Iesha and Sam discuss why people working in education need to be less sceptical of ‘marketing’ and the importance of schools ‘telling their story’. They discuss some of the practical ways in which social media can be used to engage with parents, build school culture and recruit new staff.

      In this episode Iesha and Sam discuss:

      • How a school or MAT can ensure it has a positive online and social media presence
      • How social media can help a school or MAT to tell its story and build a good reputation
      • The advantages of social media over traditional school newsletters
      • How social media can contribute to a sense of community within and around a school
      • How a school’s identity on social media can help to attract new recruits
      • How paid Twitter and Facebook advertising can help schools to target job advertisements more cheaply and effectively than through traditional media
      • Why school business managers and MAT CEOs might shy away from using these new methods
      • How teachers and pupils can both play a role in maintaining a school’s social media account
      • Why people working in education should care about marketing
      • How marketing and parental engagement go hand-in-hand
      • Top tips for how schools can use social media effectively
      • Why individual schools within a MAT need to maintain their own social media identity

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>
      sam simkins headshot

      In this episode Iesha talks to Sam Simkins. Sam is a Business Development Intern at Chiltern Learning Trust, where he maintains the social media accounts for the schools within the Trust, helping them to engage with parents and recruit new teachers. Iesha and Sam discuss why people working in education need to be less sceptical of ‘marketing’ and the importance of schools ‘telling their story’. They discuss some of the practical ways in which social media can be used to engage with parents, build school culture and recruit new staff.

      In this episode Iesha and Sam discuss:

      • How a school or MAT can ensure it has a positive online and social media presence
      • How social media can help a school or MAT to tell its story and build a good reputation
      • The advantages of social media over traditional school newsletters
      • How social media can contribute to a sense of community within and around a school
      • How a school’s identity on social media can help to attract new recruits
      • How paid Twitter and Facebook advertising can help schools to target job advertisements more cheaply and effectively than through traditional media
      • Why school business managers and MAT CEOs might shy away from using these new methods
      • How teachers and pupils can both play a role in maintaining a school’s social media account
      • Why people working in education should care about marketing
      • How marketing and parental engagement go hand-in-hand
      • Top tips for how schools can use social media effectively
      • Why individual schools within a MAT need to maintain their own social media identity

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>
      sam simkins headshot

      In this episode Iesha talks to Sam Simkins. Sam is a Business Development Intern at Chiltern Learning Trust, where he maintains the social media accounts for the schools within the Trust, helping them to engage with parents and recruit new teachers. Iesha and Sam discuss why people working in education need to be less sceptical of ‘marketing’ and the importance of schools ‘telling their story’. They discuss some of the practical ways in which social media can be used to engage with parents, build school culture and recruit new staff.

      In this episode Iesha and Sam discuss:

      • How a school or MAT can ensure it has a positive online and social media presence
      • How social media can help a school or MAT to tell its story and build a good reputation
      • The advantages of social media over traditional school newsletters
      • How social media can contribute to a sense of community within and around a school
      • How a school’s identity on social media can help to attract new recruits
      • How paid Twitter and Facebook advertising can help schools to target job advertisements more cheaply and effectively than through traditional media
      • Why school business managers and MAT CEOs might shy away from using these new methods
      • How teachers and pupils can both play a role in maintaining a school’s social media account
      • Why people working in education should care about marketing
      • How marketing and parental engagement go hand-in-hand
      • Top tips for how schools can use social media effectively
      • Why individual schools within a MAT need to maintain their own social media identity

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>
      clean No no no 21:18 Sam Baars
      #015 – Ross McGill: Feedback, technology and teacher workload https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/015-ross-mcgill-feedback-technology-teacher-workload/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=015-ross-mcgill-feedback-technology-teacher-workload Thu, 25 Jan 2018 16:00:37 +0000 Sam Baars http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=3012 accountability,blogging,classroom,feedback,OFSTED,retention,teacher voice,technology,verbal feedback,workload ross mcgill headshot

      In this episode Iesha talks to Ross McGill. Ross is an experienced educator, teacher and school leader, and founded Teacher Toolkit – the most influential blog on education in the UK. Iesha and Ross discuss teacher workload, the use of technology to reduce workload, and verbal feedback.

      In this episode Iesha and Ross discuss:

      • The power of verbal feedback compared to written feedback
      • The difficulties of evidencing verbal feedback
      • Technologies that can help teachers make effective use of verbal feedback
      • How much of a difference can excellent teachers make?
      • Should we get rid of Ofsted gradings?
      • ‘Minimum standard’ and peer-review alternatives to accountability
      • Ways of mobilising a collective teacher voice to influence policy
      • The skills that teachers can call on if they’re thinking of leaving the profession

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>
      ross mcgill headshot

      In this episode Iesha talks to Ross McGill. Ross is an experienced educator, teacher and school leader, and founded Teacher Toolkit – the most influential blog on education in the UK. Iesha and Ross discuss teacher workload, the use of technology to reduce workload, and verbal feedback.

      In this episode Iesha and Ross discuss:

      • The power of verbal feedback compared to written feedback
      • The difficulties of evidencing verbal feedback
      • Technologies that can help teachers make effective use of verbal feedback
      • How much of a difference can excellent teachers make?
      • Should we get rid of Ofsted gradings?
      • ‘Minimum standard’ and peer-review alternatives to accountability
      • Ways of mobilising a collective teacher voice to influence policy
      • The skills that teachers can call on if they’re thinking of leaving the profession

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>
      ross mcgill headshot

      In this episode Iesha talks to Ross McGill. Ross is an experienced educator, teacher and school leader, and founded Teacher Toolkit – the most influential blog on education in the UK. Iesha and Ross discuss teacher workload, the use of technology to reduce workload, and verbal feedback.

      In this episode Iesha and Ross discuss:

      • The power of verbal feedback compared to written feedback
      • The difficulties of evidencing verbal feedback
      • Technologies that can help teachers make effective use of verbal feedback
      • How much of a difference can excellent teachers make?
      • Should we get rid of Ofsted gradings?
      • ‘Minimum standard’ and peer-review alternatives to accountability
      • Ways of mobilising a collective teacher voice to influence policy
      • The skills that teachers can call on if they’re thinking of leaving the profession

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>
      clean No no no 24:19 Sam Baars
      #014 – Research round up: Child poverty, adopted children and FE https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/014childpoverty/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=014childpoverty Thu, 11 Jan 2018 16:00:27 +0000 Iesha Small http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=2958 adopted children,child poverty,economic policy,FE,Funding,further education,looked after children

      In this episode, Anna explores a selection of the research that’s been hitting our desks in recent weeks with Dr Sam Baars, Director of Research at LKMco. Sam and Anna discuss a new study which predicts a significant rise in child poverty over the next five years, what’s causing it, and what it means for the young people affected. They also unpick recent evidence that adopted children are particularly at risk of being excluded from school. Finally, they look at a range of research on Further Education, and discuss why the sector needs more attention.

      In this episode Anna and Sam discuss:

      • How we define and measure child poverty
      • Why child poverty is becoming more prevalent
      • Which parts of the country are worst affected
      • Why economic policy has important impacts on young people
      • The morality of penalising people for having large families
      • The educational fortunes of adopted children
      • The case for splitting out adopted children from other types of looked after children in official figures
      • The challenges of drawing conclusions about small pupil groups in large datasets
      • Why marginalised groups of young people are often the hardest to accurately ‘know about’
      • Why FE colleges are much less likely than schools to be rated ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’
      • The crisis in FE funding

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

      iesha@lkmco.org / @ieshasmall

      ]]>

      In this episode, Anna explores a selection of the research that’s been hitting our desks in recent weeks with Dr Sam Baars, Director of Research at LKMco. Sam and Anna discuss a new study which predicts a significant rise in child poverty over the next five years, what’s causing it, and what it means for the young people affected. They also unpick recent evidence that adopted children are particularly at risk of being excluded from school. Finally, they look at a range of research on Further Education, and discuss why the sector needs more attention.

      In this episode Anna and Sam discuss:

      • How we define and measure child poverty
      • Why child poverty is becoming more prevalent
      • Which parts of the country are worst affected
      • Why economic policy has important impacts on young people
      • The morality of penalising people for having large families
      • The educational fortunes of adopted children
      • The case for splitting out adopted children from other types of looked after children in official figures
      • The challenges of drawing conclusions about small pupil groups in large datasets
      • Why marginalised groups of young people are often the hardest to accurately ‘know about’
      • Why FE colleges are much less likely than schools to be rated ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’
      • The crisis in FE funding

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

      iesha@lkmco.org / @ieshasmall

      ]]>

      In this episode, Anna explores a selection of the research that’s been hitting our desks in recent weeks with Dr Sam Baars, Director of Research at LKMco. Sam and Anna discuss a new study which predicts a significant rise in child poverty over the next five years, what’s causing it, and what it means for the young people affected. They also unpick recent evidence that adopted children are particularly at risk of being excluded from school. Finally, they look at a range of research on Further Education, and discuss why the sector needs more attention.

      In this episode Anna and Sam discuss:

      • How we define and measure child poverty
      • Why child poverty is becoming more prevalent
      • Which parts of the country are worst affected
      • Why economic policy has important impacts on young people
      • The morality of penalising people for having large families
      • The educational fortunes of adopted children
      • The case for splitting out adopted children from other types of looked after children in official figures
      • The challenges of drawing conclusions about small pupil groups in large datasets
      • Why marginalised groups of young people are often the hardest to accurately ‘know about’
      • Why FE colleges are much less likely than schools to be rated ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’
      • The crisis in FE funding

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

      iesha@lkmco.org / @ieshasmall

      ]]>
      clean No no no 27:14 Iesha Small
      #013- Iesha Small: Teacher retention and talent management https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/013-iesha-small-teacher-retention/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=013-iesha-small-teacher-retention Thu, 14 Dec 2017 15:00:41 +0000 Iesha Small http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=2882 academies,performance related pay,recruitment,retention,schools,talent management,teacher recruitment,teacher retention,teachers,why teach

      Iesha Small is a Senior Associate at LKMco, teacher and former school leader. In this episode Iesha is interviewed by guest host, Anna Trethewey, Deputy Director of LKMco. They discuss Iesha’s report The Talent Challenge:  The looming teacher retention crisis in England’s state schools and what to do about it.

      In this episode Anna and Iesha discuss:

      • The importance of good line managers in helping teacher retention
      • How having no training budget shaped Iesha’s thoughts around professional development early in her career
      • Teacher shortages in primary vs secondary schools
      • The problems faced by schools in more deprived areas
      • What schools may have to consider if they want to retain younger ‘millennial’ teachers
      • The gap between what motivates members of SLT and other teachers
      • How schools can develop staff by “letting a title follow leadership”
      • Potential tension between the desire for rapid improvement and long term models of talent management
      • Iesha’s assertion that generally, “Happy, empowered, skilled teachers are going to teach children well.”
      • How schools can take a longer term look at development and retention
      • Why fairness and transparency is important in recognising high potential staff
      • The lack of development routes for teachers who don’t want to become leaders
      • How challenging schools can make themselves attractive when recruiting teachers
      • Why many schools may need to rethink how they performance manage staff

      Resources or people mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      ]]>

      Iesha Small is a Senior Associate at LKMco, teacher and former school leader. In this episode Iesha is interviewed by guest host, Anna Trethewey, Deputy Director of LKMco. They discuss Iesha’s report The Talent Challenge:  The looming teacher retention crisis in England’s state schools and what to do about it.

      In this episode Anna and Iesha discuss:

      • The importance of good line managers in helping teacher retention
      • How having no training budget shaped Iesha’s thoughts around professional development early in her career
      • Teacher shortages in primary vs secondary schools
      • The problems faced by schools in more deprived areas
      • What schools may have to consider if they want to retain younger ‘millennial’ teachers
      • The gap between what motivates members of SLT and other teachers
      • How schools can develop staff by “letting a title follow leadership”
      • Potential tension between the desire for rapid improvement and long term models of talent management
      • Iesha’s assertion that generally, “Happy, empowered, skilled teachers are going to teach children well.”
      • How schools can take a longer term look at development and retention
      • Why fairness and transparency is important in recognising high potential staff
      • The lack of development routes for teachers who don’t want to become leaders
      • How challenging schools can make themselves attractive when recruiting teachers
      • Why many schools may need to rethink how they performance manage staff

      Resources or people mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

      Musi]]>

      Iesha Small is a Senior Associate at LKMco, teacher and former school leader. In this episode Iesha is interviewed by guest host, Anna Trethewey, Deputy Director of LKMco. They discuss Iesha’s report The Talent Challenge:  The looming teacher retention crisis in England’s state schools and what to do about it.

      In this episode Anna and Iesha discuss:

      • The importance of good line managers in helping teacher retention
      • How having no training budget shaped Iesha’s thoughts around professional development early in her career
      • Teacher shortages in primary vs secondary schools
      • The problems faced by schools in more deprived areas
      • What schools may have to consider if they want to retain younger ‘millennial’ teachers
      • The gap between what motivates members of SLT and other teachers
      • How schools can develop staff by “letting a title follow leadership”
      • Potential tension between the desire for rapid improvement and long term models of talent management
      • Iesha’s assertion that generally, “Happy, empowered, skilled teachers are going to teach children well.”
      • How schools can take a longer term look at development and retention
      • Why fairness and transparency is important in recognising high potential staff
      • The lack of development routes for teachers who don’t want to become leaders
      • How challenging schools can make themselves attractive when recruiting teachers
      • Why many schools may need to rethink how they performance manage staff

      Resources or people mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      If you found the show useful

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Contact us with feedback, questions or future suggestions

      iesha@lkmco.org

      info@lkmco.org

      Musi]]> clean No no no 40:32 Iesha Small #012 – Rob Webster: Teaching assistants and inclusive education https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/012-rob-webster-teaching-assistants-inclusive-education/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=012-rob-webster-teaching-assistants-inclusive-education Thu, 23 Nov 2017 16:30:40 +0000 Sam Baars http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=2781 Inclusion,SEN,SEND,TAs,teaching assistants Photo of Rob Webster

      Rob Webster is a researcher at the UCL Institute of Education, where he leads the Maximising the Impact of Teaching Assistants (MITA) initiative for the UCL Centre for Inclusive Education. Rob is also Co-Director of the SEN in Secondary Education (SENSE) study. In this episode, Rob talks to Iesha about the role of teaching assistants, how they can be used more effectively, the contribution they make to SEND provision and how they could help solve the teacher recruitment crisis.

      In this episode Iesha and Rob discuss:

      • SEN or SEND?
      • How Rob’s frontline work as a teaching assistant led to him conducting research into the role of TAs
      • How TAs might be the solution to the teacher workforce crisis
      • The central role that TAs play in SEND provision
      • Segregation and streaming of SEND pupils
      • ‘Ability’ vs. ‘prior attainment’
      • Whether it’s right that SEND pupils spend more time with TAs than their peers
      • Why pupils don’t benefit from spending lots of unstructured time with TAs, but…
      • …how TAs have a consistently positive impact when they’re delivering targeted interventions
      • Given negative evidence, why schools have been happier to scrap TAs than scrap ability grouping
      • What schools can do to make better use of TAs
      • What we mean by ‘inclusion’
      • Shed Seven

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      • The SENSE study
      • The MITA initiative
      • EEF Toolkit published guidance on the effective use of teaching assistants

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

      iesha@lkmco.org / @ieshasmall

      ]]> Photo of Rob Webster

      Rob Webster is a researcher at the UCL Institute of Education, where he leads the Maximising the Impact of Teaching Assistants (MITA) initiative for the UCL Centre for Inclusive Education. Rob is also Co-Director of the SEN in Secondary Education (SENSE) study. In this episode, Rob talks to Iesha about the role of teaching assistants, how they can be used more effectively, the contribution they make to SEND provision and how they could help solve the teacher recruitment crisis.

      In this episode Iesha and Rob discuss:

      • SEN or SEND?
      • How Rob’s frontline work as a teaching assistant led to him conducting research into the role of TAs
      • How TAs might be the solution to the teacher workforce crisis
      • The central role that TAs play in SEND provision
      • Segregation and streaming of SEND pupils
      • ‘Ability’ vs. ‘prior attainment’
      • Whether it’s right that SEND pupils spend more time with TAs than their peers
      • Why pupils don’t benefit from spending lots of unstructured time with TAs, but…
      • …how TAs have a consistently positive impact when they’re delivering targeted interventions
      • Given negative evidence, why schools have been happier to scrap TAs than scrap ability grouping
      • What schools can do to make better use of TAs
      • What we mean by ‘inclusion’
      • Shed Seven

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      • The SENSE study
      • The MITA initiative
      • EEF Toolkit published guidance on the effective use of teaching assistants

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

      iesha@lkmco.org / @ieshasmall

      ]]>
      Photo of Rob Webster

      Rob Webster is a researcher at the UCL Institute of Education, where he leads the Maximising the Impact of Teaching Assistants (MITA) initiative for the UCL Centre for Inclusive Education. Rob is also Co-Director of the SEN in Secondary Education (SENSE) study. In this episode, Rob talks to Iesha about the role of teaching assistants, how they can be used more effectively, the contribution they make to SEND provision and how they could help solve the teacher recruitment crisis.

      In this episode Iesha and Rob discuss:

      • SEN or SEND?
      • How Rob’s frontline work as a teaching assistant led to him conducting research into the role of TAs
      • How TAs might be the solution to the teacher workforce crisis
      • The central role that TAs play in SEND provision
      • Segregation and streaming of SEND pupils
      • ‘Ability’ vs. ‘prior attainment’
      • Whether it’s right that SEND pupils spend more time with TAs than their peers
      • Why pupils don’t benefit from spending lots of unstructured time with TAs, but…
      • …how TAs have a consistently positive impact when they’re delivering targeted interventions
      • Given negative evidence, why schools have been happier to scrap TAs than scrap ability grouping
      • What schools can do to make better use of TAs
      • What we mean by ‘inclusion’
      • Shed Seven

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      • The SENSE study
      • The MITA initiative
      • EEF Toolkit published guidance on the effective use of teaching assistants

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

      iesha@lkmco.org / @ieshasmall

      ]]>
      clean No no no 46:31 Sam Baars
      #011 – Sam Baars: white working class boys at uni https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/011-sam-baars-white-working-class-boys-uni/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=011-sam-baars-white-working-class-boys-uni Thu, 09 Nov 2017 16:30:51 +0000 Sam Baars http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=2749 higher education,social mobility,university,white working class boys Sam Baars headshot

      Dr Sam Baars is LKMco’s Director of Research. He talks to Iesha about his research exploring how higher education can become more accessible for white working class boys.

       

      In this episode Iesha and Sam discuss

      • Why Sam’s A-levels made him more politically engaged
      • How Sam’s doctorate in Social Change led to the work that he does now
      • Why research can help marginalised groups who otherwise might be ignored
      • How surprisingly hard it is to define what a white ‘working class’ boy is
      • Why feeling as if you belong is important for success at university
      • Why working class pupils are less likely to go to university than middle class pupils
      • Why many working class pupils don’t see the point in going to university
      • Why supporting aspirations to attend university ought to begin to in primary school

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

       

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

       

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

      Iesha@lkmco.org / @ieshasmall or sam@lkmco.org / @sambaars

      ]]>
      Sam Baars headshot

      Dr Sam Baars is LKMco’s Director of Research. He talks to Iesha about his research exploring how higher education can become more accessible for white working class boys.

       

      In this episode Iesha and Sam discuss

      • Why Sam’s A-levels made him more politically engaged
      • How Sam’s doctorate in Social Change led to the work that he does now
      • Why research can help marginalised groups who otherwise might be ignored
      • How surprisingly hard it is to define what a white ‘working class’ boy is
      • Why feeling as if you belong is important for success at university
      • Why working class pupils are less likely to go to university than middle class pupils
      • Why many working class pupils don’t see the point in going to university
      • Why supporting aspirations to attend university ought to begin to in primary school

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

       

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

       

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

      Iesha@lkmco.org / @ieshasmall or sam@lkmco.org / @sambaars

      ]]>
      Sam Baars headshot

      Dr Sam Baars is LKMco’s Director of Research. He talks to Iesha about his research exploring how higher education can become more accessible for white working class boys.

       

      In this episode Iesha and Sam discuss

      • Why Sam’s A-levels made him more politically engaged
      • How Sam’s doctorate in Social Change led to the work that he does now
      • Why research can help marginalised groups who otherwise might be ignored
      • How surprisingly hard it is to define what a white ‘working class’ boy is
      • Why feeling as if you belong is important for success at university
      • Why working class pupils are less likely to go to university than middle class pupils
      • Why many working class pupils don’t see the point in going to university
      • Why supporting aspirations to attend university ought to begin to in primary school

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

       

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found here.

       

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

       

      Music credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

      Iesha@lkmco.org / @ieshasmall or sam@lkmco.org / @sambaars

      ]]>
      clean No no no 40:42 Sam Baars
      #010- Geoff Barton: Leadership, listening and learning https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/barton/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=barton Thu, 26 Oct 2017 15:30:02 +0000 Iesha Small http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=2710 ASCL,leaders,leadership,literacy,MATs,school leadership

      Geoff Barton is General Secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders. He talks to Iesha about leadership, literacy, books and radio.

      In this episode Iesha and Geoff discuss

      • Geoff’s love of 70s and 80s icon Noel Edmonds
      • Why his mum declared his exam results a “failure”
      • Why leaders need to ask fewer but better questions
      • Why literacy and social justice are linked for Geoff
      • Why Geoff feels that writing helps him to think
      • The newspaper article that Geoff had 20mins to write after a major disaster
      • His controversial election as general secretary of ASCL over the preferred candidate
      • Is ASCL a union that just wants to hold the status quo and be compliant with government?
      • Why Head teachers who become MAT CEOs are sometimes caught short

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found at https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/barton/ 

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music Credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Sample of ‘Man don’t care’ by JME . “It’s nice knowing Geoff” and “flame thrower” copyright Geoff Barton

      Want to contact us?

      Iesha@lkmco.org or info@lkmco.org

      ]]>

      Geoff Barton is General Secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders. He talks to Iesha about leadership, literacy, books and radio.

      In this episode Iesha and Geoff discuss

      • Geoff’s love of 70s and 80s icon Noel Edmonds
      • Why his mum declared his exam results a “failure”
      • Why leaders need to ask fewer but better questions
      • Why literacy and social justice are linked for Geoff
      • Why Geoff feels that writing helps him to think
      • The newspaper article that Geoff had 20mins to write after a major disaster
      • His controversial election as general secretary of ASCL over the preferred candidate
      • Is ASCL a union that just wants to hold the status quo and be compliant with government?
      • Why Head teachers who become MAT CEOs are sometimes caught short

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found at https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/barton/ 

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music Credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Sample of ‘Man don’t care’ by JME . “It’s nice knowing Geoff” and “flame thrower” copyright Geoff Barton

      Want to contact us?

      Iesha@lkmco.org or info@lkmco.org

      ]]>

      Geoff Barton is General Secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders. He talks to Iesha about leadership, literacy, books and radio.

      In this episode Iesha and Geoff discuss

      • Geoff’s love of 70s and 80s icon Noel Edmonds
      • Why his mum declared his exam results a “failure”
      • Why leaders need to ask fewer but better questions
      • Why literacy and social justice are linked for Geoff
      • Why Geoff feels that writing helps him to think
      • The newspaper article that Geoff had 20mins to write after a major disaster
      • His controversial election as general secretary of ASCL over the preferred candidate
      • Is ASCL a union that just wants to hold the status quo and be compliant with government?
      • Why Head teachers who become MAT CEOs are sometimes caught short

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found at https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/barton/ 

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music Credits:

      ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Sample of ‘Man don’t care’ by JME . “It’s nice knowing Geoff” and “flame thrower” copyright Geoff Barton

      Want to contact us?

      Iesha@lkmco.org or info@lkmco.org

      ]]>
      clean No no no 46:26 Iesha Small
      #009- Cat Scutt: Teachers, research and evidence informed practice https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/009-cat-scutt-teachers-research-evidence-informed-practice/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=009-cat-scutt-teachers-research-evidence-informed-practice Thu, 05 Oct 2017 15:00:34 +0000 Iesha Small http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=2640 Evidence,research,schools,teachers,teaching

      In this episode of the LKMco podcast, Iesha talks to Catt Scutt. Catt is the Director of Education and Research at the Chartered College of Teaching. In their discussion, Cat argues that even if research contradicts teachers’ “common sense” or professional judgement, they still can’t turn their back on it.

      In this episode Iesha and Catt discuss

      • How the Chartered College of Teaching hopes to connect research and practice for class teachers
      • Why a network approach of regular events across the country is important to help the Chartered College of Teaching connect with the teaching profession
      • How an early sabbatical as a teacher at another school led indirectly to Cat’s current role and an interest in digital tools to help teachers learn
      • Why Cat believes that designing leadership training simulations for her PhD will help school leaders to make better decisions.
      • What’s the point of becoming a chartered teacher?
      • Why Cat feels that the public respects teachers but don’t want to become teachers
      • Where early career teachers should start if they want to be more evidence informed
      • How school leaders can create a culture that embraces evidence and research engagement at all levels.
      • Canoe polo
      • And much, much more

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

       

       

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found at www.lkmco.org/podcast/007/

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

       

      Iesha@lkmco.org  or @ieshasmall

      ]]>

      In this episode of the LKMco podcast, Iesha talks to Catt Scutt. Catt is the Director of Education and Research at the Chartered College of Teaching. In their discussion, Cat argues that even if research contradicts teachers’ “common sense” or professional judgement, they still can’t turn their back on it.

      In this episode Iesha and Catt discuss

      • How the Chartered College of Teaching hopes to connect research and practice for class teachers
      • Why a network approach of regular events across the country is important to help the Chartered College of Teaching connect with the teaching profession
      • How an early sabbatical as a teacher at another school led indirectly to Cat’s current role and an interest in digital tools to help teachers learn
      • Why Cat believes that designing leadership training simulations for her PhD will help school leaders to make better decisions.
      • What’s the point of becoming a chartered teacher?
      • Why Cat feels that the public respects teachers but don’t want to become teachers
      • Where early career teachers should start if they want to be more evidence informed
      • How school leaders can create a culture that embraces evidence and research engagement at all levels.
      • Canoe polo
      • And much, much more

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

       

       

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found at www.lkmco.org/podcast/007/

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

       

      Iesha@lkmco.org  or @ieshasmall

      ]]>

      In this episode of the LKMco podcast, Iesha talks to Catt Scutt. Catt is the Director of Education and Research at the Chartered College of Teaching. In their discussion, Cat argues that even if research contradicts teachers’ “common sense” or professional judgement, they still can’t turn their back on it.

      In this episode Iesha and Catt discuss

      • How the Chartered College of Teaching hopes to connect research and practice for class teachers
      • Why a network approach of regular events across the country is important to help the Chartered College of Teaching connect with the teaching profession
      • How an early sabbatical as a teacher at another school led indirectly to Cat’s current role and an interest in digital tools to help teachers learn
      • Why Cat believes that designing leadership training simulations for her PhD will help school leaders to make better decisions.
      • What’s the point of becoming a chartered teacher?
      • Why Cat feels that the public respects teachers but don’t want to become teachers
      • Where early career teachers should start if they want to be more evidence informed
      • How school leaders can create a culture that embraces evidence and research engagement at all levels.
      • Canoe polo
      • And much, much more

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

       

       

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found at www.lkmco.org/podcast/007/

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

       

      Iesha@lkmco.org  or @ieshasmall

      ]]>
      clean No no no 46:35 Iesha Small
      #008 – Research round up: Social mobility. Age, university and employment https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/008/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=008 Fri, 11 Aug 2017 16:00:08 +0000 Iesha Small http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=2424 disadvantage,employers,research,social justice,social mobility,universities

      In this episode of the LKMco podcast, Iesha explores a selection of research with Dr Sam Baars. Sam is Director of Research at LKMco.

      They discuss social mobility in a variety of contexts. How some well-known employers are making their commitment to social mobility clear and why different generations have different perspectives about social mobility in the UK.

      In this episode Iesha and Sam discuss

      • Do we live in a meritocracy?
      • What structures need to be in place for true social mobility
      • Why are young people paradoxically jaded and optimistic about different aspects of social mobility?
      • How can employers impact social mobility?
      • What incentives do employers have to help make a fairer society?
      • The link between graduate earnings and involvement in extra-curricular activities at university
      • Why Sam feels it’s socially unjust to consider internships when recruiting for jobs or university courses
      • And much, much more

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

       

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found at

      https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/008/

       

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

      Iesha@lkmco.org  or @ieshasmall

      Sam@lkmco.org or @sambaars

       

      ]]>

      In this episode of the LKMco podcast, Iesha explores a selection of research with Dr Sam Baars. Sam is Director of Research at LKMco.

      They discuss social mobility in a variety of contexts. How some well-known employers are making their commitment to social mobility clear and why different generations have different perspectives about social mobility in the UK.

      In this episode Iesha and Sam discuss

      • Do we live in a meritocracy?
      • What structures need to be in place for true social mobility
      • Why are young people paradoxically jaded and optimistic about different aspects of social mobility?
      • How can employers impact social mobility?
      • What incentives do employers have to help make a fairer society?
      • The link between graduate earnings and involvement in extra-curricular activities at university
      • Why Sam feels it’s socially unjust to consider internships when recruiting for jobs or university courses
      • And much, much more

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

       

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found at

      https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/008/

       

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

      Iesha@lkmco.org  or @ieshasmall

      Sam@lkmco.org or @sambaars

       

      ]]>

      In this episode of the LKMco podcast, Iesha explores a selection of research with Dr Sam Baars. Sam is Director of Research at LKMco.

      They discuss social mobility in a variety of contexts. How some well-known employers are making their commitment to social mobility clear and why different generations have different perspectives about social mobility in the UK.

      In this episode Iesha and Sam discuss

      • Do we live in a meritocracy?
      • What structures need to be in place for true social mobility
      • Why are young people paradoxically jaded and optimistic about different aspects of social mobility?
      • How can employers impact social mobility?
      • What incentives do employers have to help make a fairer society?
      • The link between graduate earnings and involvement in extra-curricular activities at university
      • Why Sam feels it’s socially unjust to consider internships when recruiting for jobs or university courses
      • And much, much more

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

       

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found at

      https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/008/

       

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

      Iesha@lkmco.org  or @ieshasmall

      Sam@lkmco.org or @sambaars

       

      ]]>
      clean No no no 37:39 Iesha Small
      #007 – Prof. Geoff Whitty: Realities of evidence-informed education policy (part 2) https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/007/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=007 Fri, 28 Jul 2017 16:00:09 +0000 Iesha Small http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=2421 academies,education,education policy,free schools,OFSTED,PISA,policy,Policy tourism

      In this episode of the LKMco podcast, Iesha talks to Professor Geoff Whitty. Geoff is Professor for Equity in Education at the University of Newcastle, Australia and a former director of the Institute of EducationUniversity of London.

      They discuss the increasing globalization of educational policy and what Geoff has learnt about the importance of carefully adapting imported policies to local conditions. The first part of this conversation is in episode #006

      In this episode Iesha and Geoff discuss

      • How education policy tourism is often used to legitimise political ideologies and rhetoric
      • How adapting Teach First to English sensibilities made it more acceptable to teaching unions than Teach for America is in the US
      • The ideological interplay between England and America re Grant Maintained Schools, Charter Schools, Academies and Free schools.
      • How the same policy can have different consequences in different societies
      • Why school choice policies appear to be driving inequality in China
      • What’s wrong with slogans like “no excuses” in education
      • Why good teaching is necessary but not enough on its own to tackle inequality
      • Why those in education need to link to wider social movements to affect change
      • How inequality can be tackled worldwide
      • And much, much more

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found at www.lkmco.org/podcast/007/ 

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

      Iesha@lkmco.org  or @ieshasmall

      ]]>

      In this episode of the LKMco podcast, Iesha talks to Professor Geoff Whitty. Geoff is Professor for Equity in Education at the University of Newcastle, Australia and a former director of the Institute of EducationUniversity of London.

      They discuss the increasing globalization of educational policy and what Geoff has learnt about the importance of carefully adapting imported policies to local conditions. The first part of this conversation is in episode #006

      In this episode Iesha and Geoff discuss

      • How education policy tourism is often used to legitimise political ideologies and rhetoric
      • How adapting Teach First to English sensibilities made it more acceptable to teaching unions than Teach for America is in the US
      • The ideological interplay between England and America re Grant Maintained Schools, Charter Schools, Academies and Free schools.
      • How the same policy can have different consequences in different societies
      • Why school choice policies appear to be driving inequality in China
      • What’s wrong with slogans like “no excuses” in education
      • Why good teaching is necessary but not enough on its own to tackle inequality
      • Why those in education need to link to wider social movements to affect change
      • How inequality can be tackled worldwide
      • And much, much more

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found at www.lkmco.org/podcast/007/ 

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

      Iesha@lkmco.org  or @ieshasmall

      ]]>

      In this episode of the LKMco podcast, Iesha talks to Professor Geoff Whitty. Geoff is Professor for Equity in Education at the University of Newcastle, Australia and a former director of the Institute of EducationUniversity of London.

      They discuss the increasing globalization of educational policy and what Geoff has learnt about the importance of carefully adapting imported policies to local conditions. The first part of this conversation is in episode #006

      In this episode Iesha and Geoff discuss

      • How education policy tourism is often used to legitimise political ideologies and rhetoric
      • How adapting Teach First to English sensibilities made it more acceptable to teaching unions than Teach for America is in the US
      • The ideological interplay between England and America re Grant Maintained Schools, Charter Schools, Academies and Free schools.
      • How the same policy can have different consequences in different societies
      • Why school choice policies appear to be driving inequality in China
      • What’s wrong with slogans like “no excuses” in education
      • Why good teaching is necessary but not enough on its own to tackle inequality
      • Why those in education need to link to wider social movements to affect change
      • How inequality can be tackled worldwide
      • And much, much more

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found at www.lkmco.org/podcast/007/ 

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

      Iesha@lkmco.org  or @ieshasmall

      ]]>
      clean No no no 27:56 Iesha Small
      #006 – Prof. Geoff Whitty: Realities of evidence-informed education policy (part 1) https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/006-prof-geoff-whitty-realities-of-evidence-informed-education-policy-part-1/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=006-prof-geoff-whitty-realities-of-evidence-informed-education-policy-part-1 Fri, 14 Jul 2017 16:00:51 +0000 Iesha Small http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=2414 disadvantage,education policy,Evidence,grammar schools,policy,politics,research,social mobility

      In this episode of the LKMco podcast, Iesha talks to Professor Geoff Whitty. Geoff is Professor for Equity in Education at the University of Newcastle, Australia and a former director of the Institute of EducationUniversity of London.

      They discuss evidence based educational policy and what Geoff has learnt from a varied career tackling educational disadvantage in a variety of ways. This is the first of a two -part conversation. The second part is in episode #007

      In this episode Iesha and Geoff discuss

      • How Geoff’s exposure to social inequality in his local area at 18 affected his outlook as a young teacher and throughout his career
      • Why education research and policy is harmful if it doesn’t take account of wider social forces
      • Would investing money in fighting poverty rather than the national literacy strategy have improved literacy levels more effectively?
      • How positions of institutional leadership can be used to tackle disadvantage
      • Why Geoff feels evidence based education policy is consistently oversold in the UK
      • Why Geoff believes less than 10% of education policy is evidence-informed
      • Two well-known examples in education that were policies driven by politics rather than evidence
      • Why researchers need to capture the public imagination as well as have the ear of policy makers in order to initiate change.
      • And much, much more

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      • Sociological imagination by C. Wright Mills
      • Sir Fred Clarke
      • Lord Adonis
      • Institute of Education
      • Basil Bernstein
      • Research and policy in education by Prof. Geoff Whitty
      • Knowledge and the study of education by Prof Geoff Whitty
      • Sir Michael Barber

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found at www.lkmco.org/podcast

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

      Iesha@lkmco.org  or @ieshasmall

       

      ]]>

      In this episode of the LKMco podcast, Iesha talks to Professor Geoff Whitty. Geoff is Professor for Equity in Education at the University of Newcastle, Australia and a former director of the Institute of EducationUniversity of London.

      They discuss evidence based educational policy and what Geoff has learnt from a varied career tackling educational disadvantage in a variety of ways. This is the first of a two -part conversation. The second part is in episode #007

      In this episode Iesha and Geoff discuss

      • How Geoff’s exposure to social inequality in his local area at 18 affected his outlook as a young teacher and throughout his career
      • Why education research and policy is harmful if it doesn’t take account of wider social forces
      • Would investing money in fighting poverty rather than the national literacy strategy have improved literacy levels more effectively?
      • How positions of institutional leadership can be used to tackle disadvantage
      • Why Geoff feels evidence based education policy is consistently oversold in the UK
      • Why Geoff believes less than 10% of education policy is evidence-informed
      • Two well-known examples in education that were policies driven by politics rather than evidence
      • Why researchers need to capture the public imagination as well as have the ear of policy makers in order to initiate change.
      • And much, much more

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      • Sociological imagination by C. Wright Mills
      • Sir Fred Clarke
      • Lord Adonis
      • Institute of Education
      • Basil Bernstein
      • Research and policy in education by Prof. Geoff Whitty
      • Knowledge and the study of education by Prof Geoff Whitty
      • Sir Michael Barber

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found at www.lkmco.org/podcast

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

      Iesha@lkmco.org  or @ieshasmall

       

      ]]>

      In this episode of the LKMco podcast, Iesha talks to Professor Geoff Whitty. Geoff is Professor for Equity in Education at the University of Newcastle, Australia and a former director of the Institute of EducationUniversity of London.

      They discuss evidence based educational policy and what Geoff has learnt from a varied career tackling educational disadvantage in a variety of ways. This is the first of a two -part conversation. The second part is in episode #007

      In this episode Iesha and Geoff discuss

      • How Geoff’s exposure to social inequality in his local area at 18 affected his outlook as a young teacher and throughout his career
      • Why education research and policy is harmful if it doesn’t take account of wider social forces
      • Would investing money in fighting poverty rather than the national literacy strategy have improved literacy levels more effectively?
      • How positions of institutional leadership can be used to tackle disadvantage
      • Why Geoff feels evidence based education policy is consistently oversold in the UK
      • Why Geoff believes less than 10% of education policy is evidence-informed
      • Two well-known examples in education that were policies driven by politics rather than evidence
      • Why researchers need to capture the public imagination as well as have the ear of policy makers in order to initiate change.
      • And much, much more

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      • Sociological imagination by C. Wright Mills
      • Sir Fred Clarke
      • Lord Adonis
      • Institute of Education
      • Basil Bernstein
      • Research and policy in education by Prof. Geoff Whitty
      • Knowledge and the study of education by Prof Geoff Whitty
      • Sir Michael Barber

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found at www.lkmco.org/podcast

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

      Iesha@lkmco.org  or @ieshasmall

       

      ]]>
      clean No no no 36:01 Iesha Small
      #005 – Ellie Mulcahy: Links between improving reading in schools and prisons. https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/005-ellie-mulcahy-links-improving-reading-schools-prisons/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=005-ellie-mulcahy-links-improving-reading-schools-prisons Fri, 30 Jun 2017 16:05:00 +0000 Iesha Small http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=2337 evaluation,intervention,prison,prisoners,reading,sound training,teaching

      In this episode of the LKMco podcast, Iesha talks to colleague Ellie Mulcahy. Ellie is an educational researcher and former Early Years teacher.  They discuss Ellie’s evaluation of Sound Training (a reading intervention programme) in prisons.  Ellie outlines what lessons teachers can learn from the programme’s success and how they can translate them into action when working with “difficult customers” in schools.  They also explore the importance of repetition and how high challenge needs to be applied to all learners not just those perceived to be high ability.

      In this episode Iesha and Ellie discuss

      • Four key elements that make Sound Training successful and can be translated into learning in schools
      • The number one element that Ellie feels is missing from most school-based reading interventions
      • Shocking statistics around illiteracy in the prison population compared to the general population
      • Why keeping things simple for low ability students is not necessarily the right approach
      • Do prisoners deserve an education?
      • Links between successful literacy training in prisons and Ellie’s experience as an Early Years teacher
      • And much, much more

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found at www.lkmco.org/podcast

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

       

      Iesha@lkmco.org  or @ieshasmall

      Ellie@lkmco.org or @elmulcahy

       

      ]]>

      In this episode of the LKMco podcast, Iesha talks to colleague Ellie Mulcahy. Ellie is an educational researcher and former Early Years teacher.  They discuss Ellie’s evaluation of Sound Training (a reading intervention programme) in prisons.  Ellie outlines what lessons teachers can learn from the programme’s success and how they can translate them into action when working with “difficult customers” in schools.  They also explore the importance of repetition and how high challenge needs to be applied to all learners not just those perceived to be high ability.

      In this episode Iesha and Ellie discuss

      • Four key elements that make Sound Training successful and can be translated into learning in schools
      • The number one element that Ellie feels is missing from most school-based reading interventions
      • Shocking statistics around illiteracy in the prison population compared to the general population
      • Why keeping things simple for low ability students is not necessarily the right approach
      • Do prisoners deserve an education?
      • Links between successful literacy training in prisons and Ellie’s experience as an Early Years teacher
      • And much, much more

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found at www.lkmco.org/podcast

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

       

      Iesha@lkmco.org  or @ieshasmall

      Ellie@lkmco.org or @elmulcahy

       

      ]]>

      In this episode of the LKMco podcast, Iesha talks to colleague Ellie Mulcahy. Ellie is an educational researcher and former Early Years teacher.  They discuss Ellie’s evaluation of Sound Training (a reading intervention programme) in prisons.  Ellie outlines what lessons teachers can learn from the programme’s success and how they can translate them into action when working with “difficult customers” in schools.  They also explore the importance of repetition and how high challenge needs to be applied to all learners not just those perceived to be high ability.

      In this episode Iesha and Ellie discuss

      • Four key elements that make Sound Training successful and can be translated into learning in schools
      • The number one element that Ellie feels is missing from most school-based reading interventions
      • Shocking statistics around illiteracy in the prison population compared to the general population
      • Why keeping things simple for low ability students is not necessarily the right approach
      • Do prisoners deserve an education?
      • Links between successful literacy training in prisons and Ellie’s experience as an Early Years teacher
      • And much, much more

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Show notes and links for this episode can be found at www.lkmco.org/podcast

      Found the show useful?

      Leave a review on iTunes

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Want to contact us?

       

      Iesha@lkmco.org  or @ieshasmall

      Ellie@lkmco.org or @elmulcahy

       

      ]]>
      clean No no no 35:32 Iesha Small
      #004 – Research round up: Neuro media, The Matrix and flow https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/004-neuro-media-matrix-flow/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=004-neuro-media-matrix-flow Fri, 16 Jun 2017 19:05:29 +0000 Iesha Small http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=2274 flow,learning,neuro media,research,schools,teachers,teaching and learning,technology,the future

      Episode #004 of the LKMco podcast is one for fans of technology (and possibly science fiction). Iesha and her co-host George Duoblys discuss the potential impact of neuro media on education. This is the seemless integration of technology with our brains. They also discuss the science of ‘flow’ (total immersion in a task) and how schools might cultivate it.

      In this episode Iesha and George discuss

      • Potential educational implications in a future world where knowledge is embedded instantly into our brains as popularised by the film The Matrix
      • How widespread use of neuro media could make subjects like maths and languages redundant
      • If students instantly have knowledge of all facts known to mankind what is education for?
      • How the psychological theory of flow can help to explain lessons where time flies and students are totally immersed in learning
      • What teachers can do to create conditions of flow in their lessons
      • The importance of challenge in Flow

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

       

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Producer: Iesha Small

      Found the show useful?

      Leave  a review on iTunes

      ]]>

      Episode #004 of the LKMco podcast is one for fans of technology (and possibly science fiction). Iesha and her co-host George Duoblys discuss the potential impact of neuro media on education. This is the seemless integration of technology with our brains. They also discuss the science of ‘flow’ (total immersion in a task) and how schools might cultivate it.

      In this episode Iesha and George discuss

      • Potential educational implications in a future world where knowledge is embedded instantly into our brains as popularised by the film The Matrix
      • How widespread use of neuro media could make subjects like maths and languages redundant
      • If students instantly have knowledge of all facts known to mankind what is education for?
      • How the psychological theory of flow can help to explain lessons where time flies and students are totally immersed in learning
      • What teachers can do to create conditions of flow in their lessons
      • The importance of challenge in Flow

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

       

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Producer: Iesha Small

      Found the show useful?

      Leave  a review on iTunes

      ]]>

      Episode #004 of the LKMco podcast is one for fans of technology (and possibly science fiction). Iesha and her co-host George Duoblys discuss the potential impact of neuro media on education. This is the seemless integration of technology with our brains. They also discuss the science of ‘flow’ (total immersion in a task) and how schools might cultivate it.

      In this episode Iesha and George discuss

      • Potential educational implications in a future world where knowledge is embedded instantly into our brains as popularised by the film The Matrix
      • How widespread use of neuro media could make subjects like maths and languages redundant
      • If students instantly have knowledge of all facts known to mankind what is education for?
      • How the psychological theory of flow can help to explain lessons where time flies and students are totally immersed in learning
      • What teachers can do to create conditions of flow in their lessons
      • The importance of challenge in Flow

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

       

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Producer: Iesha Small

      Found the show useful?

      Leave  a review on iTunes

      ]]>
      clean No no no 32:54 Iesha Small
      #003 – Will Millard: Oracy. Learning well through talk https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/003-will-millard-oracy-learning-well-talk/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=003-will-millard-oracy-learning-well-talk Fri, 02 Jun 2017 11:05:26 +0000 Iesha Small http://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=2256 education,Evidence,oracy,reports,research,talk,teaching and learning

      In this episode of the LKMco Youth and Education podcast, Iesha talks to colleague Will Millard. Will is an educational researcher and former English teacher.

      They discuss Will’s report Oracy: The state of speaking in our schools. They also explore how teachers can be more intentional in using talk effectively in the classroom to improve learning.

      In this podcast Will shares…

      • His definition of oracy as “learning to speak well” and “learning well through talk”
      • How oracy is important to all subject areas and some elements are subject specific
      • His answer to teachers who say that kids talk too much already!
      • What Will wished he’d known about talk and oracy in the classroom when he was a teacher
      • Questions that school leaders and class teachers need to ask themselves if they want oracy to be effective in their school
      • The socio-economic factors that affect oracy
      • Why oracy appears to be more highly prized in early years, primary and special schools
      • What policy makers and school leaders could do to champion oracy and remove barriers for teachers
      • Why teachers in independent school appear to value oracy more than those in the state sector

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Producer: Iesha Small

      Found the show useful? Leave a review on itunes

       

      ]]>

      In this episode of the LKMco Youth and Education podcast, Iesha talks to colleague Will Millard. Will is an educational researcher and former English teacher.

      They discuss Will’s report Oracy: The state of speaking in our schools. They also explore how teachers can be more intentional in using talk effectively in the classroom to improve learning.

      In this podcast Will shares…

      • His definition of oracy as “learning to speak well” and “learning well through talk”
      • How oracy is important to all subject areas and some elements are subject specific
      • His answer to teachers who say that kids talk too much already!
      • What Will wished he’d known about talk and oracy in the classroom when he was a teacher
      • Questions that school leaders and class teachers need to ask themselves if they want oracy to be effective in their school
      • The socio-economic factors that affect oracy
      • Why oracy appears to be more highly prized in early years, primary and special schools
      • What policy makers and school leaders could do to champion oracy and remove barriers for teachers
      • Why teachers in independent school appear to value oracy more than those in the state sector

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Producer: Iesha Small

      Found the show useful? Leave a review on itunes

       

      ]]>

      In this episode of the LKMco Youth and Education podcast, Iesha talks to colleague Will Millard. Will is an educational researcher and former English teacher.

      They discuss Will’s report Oracy: The state of speaking in our schools. They also explore how teachers can be more intentional in using talk effectively in the classroom to improve learning.

      In this podcast Will shares…

      • His definition of oracy as “learning to speak well” and “learning well through talk”
      • How oracy is important to all subject areas and some elements are subject specific
      • His answer to teachers who say that kids talk too much already!
      • What Will wished he’d known about talk and oracy in the classroom when he was a teacher
      • Questions that school leaders and class teachers need to ask themselves if they want oracy to be effective in their school
      • The socio-economic factors that affect oracy
      • Why oracy appears to be more highly prized in early years, primary and special schools
      • What policy makers and school leaders could do to champion oracy and remove barriers for teachers
      • Why teachers in independent school appear to value oracy more than those in the state sector

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Music Credits:  ‘Oui’ by Simon Mathewson from  and ‘Jump for joy’ by Scott Holmes both from  http://freemusicarchive.org

      Producer: Iesha Small

      Found the show useful? Leave a review on itunes

       

      ]]>
      clean No no no 36:48 Iesha Small
      #002 – Research Round Up: Social segregation and white Working Class boys https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/002-sam-georges-research-round/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=002-sam-georges-research-round Fri, 19 May 2017 16:05:38 +0000 Iesha Small https://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=2168 early years,Evidence,grammar schools,outstanding,policy,research,white working class boys

      In episode #002  Dr Sam Baars talks to George Duoblys. They ask do faith schools perpetuate social social segregation? Is focusing on white working class boys helpful? Do Ofsted’s gradings for nurseries really measure the right things?

      Key points

      • Early years: Kids who go to ‘outstanding’ nurseries don’t necessarily do better than those who don’t when they get to primary school.
      • Selection in the non-selective school sector. House prices drive segregation.
      • Poor kids in rich areas are still less likely to get into the areas’ best schools when compared to their  wealthier peers
      • The challenges white working class boys face are not unique to them, they are also shared by many pupils from other working class backgrounds.
      • Why evidence against grammars might not be enough to change supporters’ minds.

      George and Sam also commiserate about that embarrassing moment when you realise you’re sat next to the author of a report you should have read… but haven’t.

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Music credits

      Oui by Simon Mathewson from http://freemusicarchive.org

      The LKMco Podcast

      ]]>

      In episode #002  Dr Sam Baars talks to George Duoblys. They ask do faith schools perpetuate social social segregation? Is focusing on white working class boys helpful? Do Ofsted’s gradings for nurseries really measure the right things?

      Key points

      • Early years: Kids who go to ‘outstanding’ nurseries don’t necessarily do better than those who don’t when they get to primary school.
      • Selection in the non-selective school sector. House prices drive segregation.
      • Poor kids in rich areas are still less likely to get into the areas’ best schools when compared to their  wealthier peers
      • The challenges white working class boys face are not unique to them, they are also shared by many pupils from other working class backgrounds.
      • Why evidence against grammars might not be enough to change supporters’ minds.

      George and Sam also commiserate about that embarrassing moment when you realise you’re sat next to the author of a report you should have read… but haven’t.

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Music credits

      Oui by Simon Mathewson from http://freemusicarchive.org

      The LKMco Podcast

      ]]>

      In episode #002  Dr Sam Baars talks to George Duoblys. They ask do faith schools perpetuate social social segregation? Is focusing on white working class boys helpful? Do Ofsted’s gradings for nurseries really measure the right things?

      Key points

      • Early years: Kids who go to ‘outstanding’ nurseries don’t necessarily do better than those who don’t when they get to primary school.
      • Selection in the non-selective school sector. House prices drive segregation.
      • Poor kids in rich areas are still less likely to get into the areas’ best schools when compared to their  wealthier peers
      • The challenges white working class boys face are not unique to them, they are also shared by many pupils from other working class backgrounds.
      • Why evidence against grammars might not be enough to change supporters’ minds.

      George and Sam also commiserate about that embarrassing moment when you realise you’re sat next to the author of a report you should have read… but haven’t.

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      Music credits

      Oui by Simon Mathewson from http://freemusicarchive.org

      The LKMco Podcast

      ]]>
      clean No no no 29:22 Iesha Small
      #001 – Bart Shaw: Poor Pupil’s Progress at Secondary School https://www.lkmco.org/podcast/001-poor-pupils-progress-secondary-school/#utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=001-poor-pupils-progress-secondary-school Sun, 30 Apr 2017 11:05:33 +0000 Iesha Small https://www.lkmco.org/?post_type=podcast&p=2151 podcast,policy,poverty,research,social mobility,teaching

      In this episode of the LKMco Education and Youth Podcast, Iesha talks to colleague, Bart Shaw. Bart is a researcher, former teacher and civil servant who lives in Sheffield.

      They discuss Bart’s recent Social Mobility Commission report on poor pupils’ progress at secondary school.

      In this podcast Bart shares…

      • What he wishes he had known from this report when he was a teacher himself.
      • How his background as a former geography teacher in rural Derbyshire and as a civil servant affects his approach to research.
      • What Social Mobility means to him.
      • Why poor children who beat the odds by achieving well at primary school fall back at secondary school.
      • The complex interactions between ethnicity and poverty.
      • The corrosive effect on poor children of putting them in ability sets or streams.

      Iesha also quizzes Bart on what he would do if he were Education Secretary for the day and learns a bit of Northern-speak.

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      ]]>

      In this episode of the LKMco Education and Youth Podcast, Iesha talks to colleague, Bart Shaw. Bart is a researcher, former teacher and civil servant who lives in Sheffield.

      They discuss Bart’s recent Social Mobility Commission report on poor pupils’ progress at secondary school.

      In this podcast Bart shares…

      • What he wishes he had known from this report when he was a teacher himself.
      • How his background as a former geography teacher in rural Derbyshire and as a civil servant affects his approach to research.
      • What Social Mobility means to him.
      • Why poor children who beat the odds by achieving well at primary school fall back at secondary school.
      • The complex interactions between ethnicity and poverty.
      • The corrosive effect on poor children of putting them in ability sets or streams.

      Iesha also quizzes Bart on what he would do if he were Education Secretary for the day and learns a bit of Northern-speak.

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      ]]>

      In this episode of the LKMco Education and Youth Podcast, Iesha talks to colleague, Bart Shaw. Bart is a researcher, former teacher and civil servant who lives in Sheffield.

      They discuss Bart’s recent Social Mobility Commission report on poor pupils’ progress at secondary school.

      In this podcast Bart shares…

      • What he wishes he had known from this report when he was a teacher himself.
      • How his background as a former geography teacher in rural Derbyshire and as a civil servant affects his approach to research.
      • What Social Mobility means to him.
      • Why poor children who beat the odds by achieving well at primary school fall back at secondary school.
      • The complex interactions between ethnicity and poverty.
      • The corrosive effect on poor children of putting them in ability sets or streams.

      Iesha also quizzes Bart on what he would do if he were Education Secretary for the day and learns a bit of Northern-speak.

      Resources/people featured or mentioned

      ]]>
      clean No no no 38:27 Iesha Small