Who We Are

We believe society should ensure all children and young people receive the support they need to make a fulfilling transition to adulthood. We work towards this belief by articulating a vision for a society which does so, inspiring a desire to pursue it and enabling organisations to achieve it.

We work across the education, youth and policy sectors. We help organisations develop and evaluate projects for young people and carry out academic and policy research and campaigning about the issues that experience tells us matter.

What We Do

We carry out policy research and campaigning as well as working directly with schools, teachers, and education and youth organisations.

  • We research, write and publish in order to influence policy makers, those working in the sector and the public as a whole. 
  • We work with education and youth organisations by developing and managing new projects, assessing impact and improving quality. 
  • We generate our income from the work we do and use it to fund more work on the issues which our experience and research tell us make a difference to young people.

Our social impact reports tell us we are good at:

  • Pinning down the crux of a problem and finding a solution.
  • Building strong and fun relationships.
  • Working quickly, rigorously and without fuss.
  • Relating everything we do back to our experience of working with young people and our understanding of the sector.

Our Team

Loic

Loic Menzies

Director

Loic Menzies is Director of LKMco, a Tutor for Canterbury Christ Church University’s Faculty of Education and a trustee of the charities UnLtd and SexYOUality. He was previously Associate Senior Manager and Head of History and Social Sciences at St. George’s R.C. School in North West London. Before that he was a youth worker involved in youth participation and young person-led community projects. He now specialises in education policy, youth development, social enterprise and school-based teacher training. He holds a degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics from Magdalen College, Oxford.

  • Email Loic Menzies
  • Tel: 07793 370459
Anna

Anna Trethewey

Senior Associate

Anna Trethewey is a Senior Associate at LKMco. She is an experienced teacher and manager and has extensive youthwork experience. Anna specialises in helping organisations at a strategic level, increasing the impact they have on disadvantaged young people. Previously, Anna taught in Lewisham and Norwich and was a learning Associate for Teach First and Christ Church University College.

eleanor

Eleanor Bernardes

Associate

Eleanor Bernardes is an Associate at LKMco and draws together a broad base of education, research, arts and business experience. She has over ten years experience in education, most recently at the RSA Academy in Tipton where she was Literacy Coordinator and a Team Leader for the RSA Curriculum ‘Opening Minds’. She was also closely involved with the International Baccalaureate Organisation (IBO) in developing the Approaches to Learning strand of the IB Career-related Certificate (IBCC). She was awarded a distinction for her MA in Educational Leadership from Warwick University.

Sam

Sam Baars

Research Associate

Sam Baars is a Research Associate at LKMco. He has particular interests in youth research, area-based inequalities and social science impact, and has experience using a range of quantitative and qualitative methods, from film-based work in schools to rapid research reviews and large-scale survey analysis. Sam believes that robust, innovative social research is the key to tackling the barriers that prevent some young people from making fulfilling transitions to adulthood, and he channels this belief into a range of research projects at LKMco. Sam holds a PhD in Social Change from the University of Manchester.

  • Email Sam Baars
  • Tel: 07814 609596
Bart colour

Bart Shaw

Associate

Bart Shaw is an Associate at LKMco and combines experience of policy making at the heart of central government with hands-on experience as a teacher and middle leader in school. Bart joined the Department for Education and Skills as part of the Civil Service Fast Stream in 2006. There he developed, delivered and evaluated national policies including the £13 million subsidy pathfinder which helped disadvantaged students access after-school activities. He left in 2011 to work directly in schools. Bart holds an MA in Governance and Development from the University of Sussex and has been a trustee and advisor for the charity Development Nepal.

  • Email Bart Shaw
  • Tel: 07958 049171

Our Projects

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‘Educational Aspirations: How English schools can work with parents to keep them on track’

A short report on research and practice in the field of educational aspirations for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation (2013)

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‘Lessons from London Schools: Investigating the Success’

A research report analysing the success of London Schools, commissioned by CfBT and carried out with the Centre for London (2014).

First Story

Impact evaluation of their creative writing programme, placing successful writers in disadvantaged schools.

Our Latest Blogs

Aspirations: an overview of the research

4th September 2015

Presentation on the ‘aspiration myth’ by Dr Sam Baars and Eleanor Bernardes of LKMco for the Somerset Association of Secondary Heads (SASH) For more information email sam@lkmco.org or eleanor@lkmco.org SASH pp v2

Kick a dog when it’s down: Fining schools for struggling

25th August 2015

Today’s Policy Exchange Report argues for fining schools when pupils do not achieve a C in English and Maths in order to better fund Further Education (FE) colleges. Actually, that’s how it’s been spun, really what I think they’re trying to say is that funding should be transferred from Secondary school budgets to FE. Which … Read more

New schools and ‘better’ places

17th August 2015

Director of the New Schools Network, Nick Timothy has claimed that new figures “show beyond doubt that we need more new schools- not just to meet demand but to improve quality.” My own analysis suggests that this is not the case. The claim was made in a piece in yesterday’s Sunday Times based on figures … Read more